by Andy SmithPosted on

Nathan French, a fashion designer-turned-fine artist, crafts captivating and unsettling sculptures crystals, feathers, wax, and other unexpected materials. The artist, who appears in the upcoming Park Park Studios group show “Wasteland,” had previously created wearable art in his previous career. And in fine art, threads from that training endure.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Joe Coleman’s multi-faceted practice, encompassing painting, performance, and writing, has long made him a revered figure in underground art. In his upcoming show at Andrew Edlin Gallery in New York (where Coleman first emerged), “Joe Coleman and The Shadow Self,” 25 years of the artist’s work is examined. The show kicks off Oct. 25 and runs through Dec. 7 at the space.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Lucila Biscione creates surreal scenes with paper, ink, and pencil, with lush backdrops and roaming creatures. The Buenos Aires-born, Berlin-based “papercut” artist primarily uses muted tones in the works shown here, adding to worlds that appear either ancient and lived-in—further underscoring their fairytale quality.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Using sub-pixel techniques and additive color theory, Aches creates murals and portraits that reflect today’s digital world with analogue spraypaint and acrylics. The Irish artist, whose work has been seen in Spain, Denmark, England, Switzerland, the U.S., and beyond, applies this experimentation to large figurative works, gallery portraits, and traditional graffiti text.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ellis Tolsma’s vibrant costumes recall the famous parties of Germany’s Bauhaus school in the 1920s. Like her prints and sculptures, Tolsma has a knack for integrating geometric forms into striking creations. The illustrator “and maker” hails from the Netherlands.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Conveying elapsed time and bombastic energy, Mitchell Villa’s process involves long strokes and motions that use his entire body. The self-taught painter depicts scenes that range from Biblical allusions to horror to intimate domestic portraits. Works like the triptych “Dinner Party” show the artist’s penchant for controlled cacophony.