by Andy SmithPosted on

João Ruas, a painter based in São Paulo, Brazil, crafts ghostly, surreal scenes that blend mythology, warfare, and nature. Even his most peaceful works carry a mystery and sense of recent danger. In a new show at Jonathan Levine Gallery, titled “Geist,” the artist evolves these themes and process. The show kicks off May 13 and runs through June 10.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Do Ho Suh’s installations and works on paper use silk and thread to create architectural wonders. Other times, his site-specific work has included entire houses, built, slanted, and placed in odd places to explore the concept of space and home.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Andi Soto, a Panama-based artist, uses ink, graphite, prismacolor pencils, gel pens, and other materials to create her intricate figures, often bare and seemingly vulnerable. Soto often removes flesh and other elements while adorning her female characters with head-dressings. Yet, the parts that remain are rendered in absorbing and detailed linework. In the past, the artist has described her style as “knitting with ink.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

From certain angles, works by Noah Scalin can just look like piles and piles of clothes strewn along the floor. But at the right angle, absorbing portraits come into focus. Recent subjects include Hellen Keller, Maggie L. Walker, and others. The length of these sculptures can comprise around 30 feet. His work explores “the theme of transience – specifically the temporary nature of our individual lives and tenuous nature of human existence on the planet.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Dan Gluibizzi, a Portland-based artist, mixes acrylics and watercolors for his works, each a collection of portraits that together create social examinations. Whether his subjects are in business attire or unclothed, an intimacy carries throughout the sparse works. The artist scours the Internet, specifically nudist blogs and Tumblrs, for inspiration in creating his paintings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Tatsuya Tanaka’s photographs combines normal objects and tiny figures to craft surreal scenes. A phone becomes a fishing hole; a whistle becomes a slide. In each of these daily works, the artist uses scale and humor to make us re-examine the items we use each day. The blissful creations are part of an ongoing, daily project. An enormous catalog of these scenes goes back to April of 2011.