by Andy SmithPosted on

Sisters Caitlin Duennebier and Nicole Duennebier currently have a collaborative show at Simmons University’s Trustman Gallery. Caitlin Duennebier’s fantastical practice encompasses sculpture, drawing, and other media, while Nicole Duennebier, a painter last featured on HiFructose.com here, crafts work with the sensibilities of 17th-century still-life with unexpected subjects. “Love Superior, a Death Supreme” runs through March 18 at the space.

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Noboru Tsubaki

In the group show “Parergon: Japanese Art of the 1980s and 1990s,” Blum & Poe offers a survey of the country’s practitioners of two decades. “Part 1” is currently being held at the Los Angeles gallery, with Noboru Tsubaki, Yukinori Yanagi, and Tsuyoshi Ozawa are among the artists featured in the show. “Part 1” and “Part 2” are curated by Mika Yoshitake.

by Andy SmithPosted on

SeungMo Park cuts and manipulates layers of wire mesh into absorbing scenes. In recent bodies of work, the artist creates illusionary installations and sculptures that viewers can pass through. Elsewhere, the artist does fiberglass lifecasting with aluminum wire wrapping.

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Recent photography and costuming work by the duo Kahn & Selesnick chronicles the travels of Truppe Fledermaus, a cabaret troupe of “would-be mystics who catalogue their absurdist attempts to augur a future that seems increasingly in peril due to environmental pressures.” The “Book of Fate” works showcase the pair’s talents in both installation work and crafting narratives.

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The collages of Andrew Blucha, who works under the moniker “metafables,” crafts fantastical and dark-surrealist illustrations. The London artist’s motifs include skeletal, mystical blazes, and Victorian fashion. Contained within these are also contemporary winks.

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Paola Idrontino‘s massive textile sculpture “Evanescent” depicts the scourge of coral bleaching in the world’s oceans, brought on by climate change. The work, which took years to complete, was recently on display at Museu del Disseny de Barcelona. Idrontino’s practice includes textiles, wearable art, and photography.