by CaroPosted on

For five years in a row, the open air exhibition “Sculpture in the City” has brought some of the best contemporary artists to the public in London. Opening this week on July 9th, this year’s installment will feature new works by Ekkehard Altenburger, Bruce Beasley, Adam Chodzko, Ceal Floyer, Laura Ford, Damien Hirst, Shan Hur, Folkert de Jong, Sigalit Landau, Kris Martin, Keita Miyazaki, Tomoaki Suzuki, Xavier Veilhan, and Ai Weiwei. The exhibit merges the new with the old as their works are set against the city’s most historic landmarks. Take a look at more photos of Sculpture in the City 2015 as it comes together, after the jump.

by CaroPosted on

Berlin-based French artist Jaybo Monk (covered here) creates visual collages where figures and their surroundings become one, a place that he calls “nowhere.” He then mixes unexpected elements into this nonsensical space, an experimentation Jaybo also carries into his sculptural works. “I want to disobey in my paintings; disobey the symmetry, the techniques and the narratives system. I am interested in nonsense, the only space for me where freedom is real. I use tools like chance and mistakes to evaluate my craft. I flirt with the impossible. I need to go to places I`ve never been before.” We visited with Jaybo in his Berlin studio, where he is now working on a new series inspired by immigration.

by CaroPosted on

Canadian artist Mark Heine is working on a series of oil paintings inspired by sirens, mythical maidens of the deep. Like his subjects, which are equally beautiful and haunting creatures, Heine’s paintings embody both beauty and feelings of unease. His work has inspired polarizing reactions; some viewers feeling discomfort, while leaving others entranced. Perhaps this feeling of discomfort can be attributed to Heine’s use of tension, as in the way his sirens just barely reach the surface to breathe, or linger above it. Although his premise is based on mythology, it is coupled with a heightened sense of realism.

by CaroPosted on

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For years, artists have been using GIFs in mind blowing ways to bring their visions to life. Native American GIF artist George Redhawk aka DarkAngel0ne, who is blind, uses them to “see” art. With the help of visual aides and using photo manipulation software designed for the visually impaired, Redhawk creates eerily captivating versions of his favorite paintings and photographs. He doesn’t call himself an “artist” but tell that to the more than seven million people who have viewed his work online.

by Nick PizanaPosted on

Throughout time, flowers have stood as symbols of beauty. Their vibrant color and pleasant aroma has made them integral parts of rituals around the world. To see them as bouquets and arrangements in the background is common in many cultures. Floral artist Kirk Cheng pays tribute to flowers by making attention grabbing displays, which take beauty that is normally glanced over and push it to the center of attention. Cheng creates wall gardens of seasonal plants, drawing the symbolism found in the plant’s color or species. Behind the glass of sleek dioramas, they look like perfectly preserved specimens from some other dreamy world.

by CaroPosted on

In recent years, Mexico City has played host to some of the most progressive urban artists in the world. Many of them have come together in Celeya Brothers’ anniversary exhibition, “Cuatro Ugal A Uno”: 3TTMan, Christiaan Conradie, Franco Fasoli aka JAZ, Fusca, Augustine Kofie, Lesuperdemon, Sten & Lex, Sanez, Smithe and Jorge Tellaeche. The group represents not only the freshman artists to show with the gallery, but also the city’s international draw, hailing from the United States, South Africa, to Argentina. Take a look at more photos from the exhibition after the jump.