by Andy SmithPosted on

Ivan Meshkov, an artist based in Chelyabinsk, Russia, used pencil and ink to create moody, hyperdetailed works often adorned with skulls, squids, and other iconography often found in tattoo culture. His work can be seen on album cover from bands of varying genres, including acts like Black Urn, Ruhr, Potlatch, Humbaba, Human Sprawl, and others.

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Stacey Page

A new group show titled “Process” features artists who use photography as “as a means to an end rather than an end in itself.” This includes usage, manipulation, and altering of photographs in media like drawing, digital art, collage, painting, and more. The Helikon Gallery & Studios show features artists like Jinsil Lee, Jessica Wohl, Corianne Wells, Curt Bean, Nicki Crock, Peter Yumi, Anitra Isler, and several others. The show runs March 18 through April 22.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Zhang Jian Long, an artist based in China, crafts bronze sculptures and paintings that touch on the innocence, mischief, and broader whimsy of being a kid. Against natural backdrops, the mood and memories evoked by the pieces ring even truer. And although there are flourishes of cultures throughout time contained in the piece, the materials used give the works a timeless quality.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Max Guther, a 25-year-old illustrator living in Germany, Guther creates “digital collages by transforming photographic material, textures and self-constructed objects.” The artist uses a top-down perspective reminiscent of computer games of yesterday, offering both a voyeuristic and broad point of view. In a series of illustrations titled “The Goodlife,” Guther explores the balance of relaxation, work, and “social environment.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Sergei Isupov’s figurative porcelain and stoneware sculptures use the material in differing ways. The artist sometimes uses the surface to create 2D renderings, and elsewhere, the characters are three-dimensional. More recently, some of the works do both on the same piece.

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Esteban Diacono, a motion graphics designer based in Buenos Aires, Argentina, creates surreal animations that blend both realistic subjects and humorous exercises in staging and physics. On Diacono’s Instagram page, he often posts “sketches” and experiments, rendered as absorbing and insightful moments of his process.