by Andy SmithPosted on


Hari & Deepti

Arch Enemy Arts’ current group show, Pulp 2, is the gallery’s annual works on paper affair, with this crop including Matt Gordon, Kit Mizeres, Caitlin McCormack, Thomas Ascott, and several others. The Philadelphia spot hosts the show through Jan. 30. This is the second installment of Pulp, which debuted last year.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Dominik Schmitt’s oil and acrylic paintings carry flashes of dark surrealism, clinical diagrams, and a provocative, humorous sensibility. The German painter’s use of text, often paired with specific elements of a work or buried under abstraction, add another layer of intrigue to each strange narrative. The artist’s work has been shown across Europe.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Whether it’s drawing, acrylic paintings, or mixed-media sculptures, the work of John Casey is a strange, often-humorous assault on the viewer. Casey takes both the familiar and the form of the portrait and bends them to his off-kilter sensibility. Read our 2013 studio visit with the artist here.

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Andrew Schoultz’s mixed-media explorations of political discourse, cyberspace, and reality itself is part of an exhibition closing these weekend at Hosfelt Gallery in San Francisco. According to a statement, his new body of work “questions the meaning and function of public space and the nature of political discourse.” He uses illusive techniques to put forth this dialogue, blending abstraction, strange creatures, and converging universes to navigate it. He was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here. Schoultz also appeared in Hi-Fructose Vol. 42.

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Cuba-born artist Juan Travieso blends nature and abstraction in his oil and acrylic paintings. From endangered animals to cultural icons, Travieso’s explorations track the changing world by both capturing its beauty and relaying the bleakness of its treatment. The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

The work of Cezar Berje straddles that difficult line between utterly absorbing and repulsive. In his illustrations, he uses his immense talents with color and detail to create portraits that warrant study. His projects for companies like Netflix and the Hangloose surf brand show how this sensibility can adapt. Berje has a particular knack for recontextualizing pop icons, absorbing them into his colorful, unsettling world.