by Andy SmithPosted on

At Galerie Le Feuvre in Paris, works by Invader are presented in a new show called “Masterpieces.” Invader is the enigmatic street artist known for crafting square ceramic tiles into images that resemble digital, pixelated renderings throughout the past few decades. The gallery says that the show was triggered by “discovery of works dated from 1997.” The artist was featured way back in Hi-Fructose Magazine Vol. 2.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Matthew Ivan Cherry, a Boston-based painter, creates oil portraits that ooze with vulnerability and a erratic, yet cohesive style. He uses his subjects, often met on the streets or on social media, to explore issues of individuality, gender identity, and the inherent beauty of the human form. Certain projects, like “somewhereX,” are tethered to Cherry’s upbringing as a Mormon. The project features enormous portraits of LGBTQ mormons (whether active or inactive), including Cherry himself.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ohio-born oil painter Herb Roe creates surreal scenes that are actually grounded in reality. Recent work documents the Courir de Mardi Gras, a traditional pre-Lenten bash attended by Cajun and Creole residents of his adopted home of Louisiana. In these celebrations, revelers wear costumes “drawn from medieval traditions, frontier era depictions of Native Americans and political and social commentary,” the artist says. Partially disguised, the members of these parties bring a lively and uninhibited energy to the proceedings.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Chun Sung-Myung creates surreal, figurative installations full of sculpted characters often having the artist’s own face. These dreamlike situations move between distress, somberness, and a broader vulnerability. The characters, representing part of the artist’s own psyche, often exist in modes of solitude or surrounded by otherworldly creations.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Amy Sherald’s oil paintings are arresting portraits, absorbing in their choices of palette and mood. Within her works’ titles, we’re given further insight into the personalities of these figures, like “What’s Precious Inside Of Him Does Not Care To Be Known By The Mind In Ways That Diminish Its Presence (All American)” and “Try On Dreams Until I Find The One That Fits Me. They All Fit Me.” Yet, these works stand alone as engrossing, vibrant odes to individualism. For a recent show at Monique Meloche Gallery in Chicago, the venue said that the artist creates “imagined figures based on real-life interactions, subverting and exploring notions of black identity through her unique sense of visual culture, color and line.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Bernie Wrightson, a comic book industry vet and celebrated illustrator, died on March 18. The artist was vastly influential for generations of illustrators, cited for his elaborate line work and absorbing detail. Wrightson was legend in the horror genre, in particular, mixing both the beautiful and the unsettling in his pen and brush work. Shown are images from his revered Bernie Wrightson’s Frankenstein series, adapting the classic Mary Shelley novel.