by CaroPosted on

Seattle based artist Claire Johnson and Canadian artist Brad Woodfin each portray their own take on natural beauty with realistic detail. While Johnson overpowers her canvases with largescale aerial landscapes, Woodfin’s animal subjects are mysteriously bereft of their environment. Opening tonight, the two artists will debut their new works together at Roq la Rue Gallery in Seattle.

by CaroPosted on

Kari-Lise Alexander is fascinated by the landscape and mythology of her Scandinavian roots. We recently featured her ethereal oil and acrylic paintings on our blog, mostly portraits of girls that resemble the nymphs of Nordic folklore. Living and working in Seattle, with its cool and wet winters, also provides Alexander with inspiration, and we often find her subjects bathing in or near water. She portrays mythical swan-maidens in her upcoming solo exhibition at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco, “A Lovelorn Theft”.

by CaroPosted on

Despite some drizzly weather, Portland is looking a little more colorful this week. As of August 24th, the nonprofit mural festival Forest for the Trees, previously covered here, has been in high gear as 29 international artists work their magic on buildings across the city. The festival is co-directed by local artist Gage Hamilton and gallerist Matt Wagner of Hellion Gallery in Portland, who wanted to expand on their city’s visual identity through art. For its third year in a row, the project has a goal of creating 19 collaborative new murals.

by CaroPosted on

We first featured Connecticut based Nataly “Kukula” Abramovitch in Hi-Fructose Vol. 7, who paints fashion obsessed pale-skinned beauties that transform into ornate objects. For her next solo exhibition “Haute Debutantes” at AFA Gallery in New York, opening September 5th, Kukula continues to explore this idea of transformation and female beauty. Her definition of a debutante, a high-class girl entering into fashionable society, is not what you might expect.

by CaroPosted on

Filipino surrealist Jon Jaylo creates brilliantly colored and riddled oil paintings inspired by poetry and stories. His paintings have earned him the moniker “The Enigma” for his puzzling depictions of a parallel universe where animals wear clothes, children take on adult personas and gravity ceases to exist. Jaylo has said that he is never completely satisfied with his style, which varies from piece to piece, influenced by a range of artists like Rene Magritte, Paul Delvaux, Gustav Klimt, Frida Kahlo, Salvador Dalí, and William Bougereau. Opening September 12th, Jaylo will make his US debut with his solo exhibition “As the Moon Draws Water” at Distinction Gallery in California.

by CaroPosted on

New York based Japanese artist Kumi Yamashita, featured here, creates unique pieces of art using everyday objects and materials like paper and plastic. Among her most notable and surprising works are her Light-shadow series, where materials are arranged in relation to a single light source to reveal the true subject in the shadows. Opening on September 11th, Yamashita will exhibit a variety of new works in a solo exhibition at Art Front Gallery in Tokyo. In addition to her popular shadow art, she will present a series inspired by origami, the art of folding.