by Andy SmithPosted on

Evren Erol’s mixed-media sculptures appear to exist in states of change, dissipating or entering into life. Blending acrylic painting on polyester and wood, the artist is able to convey figures that are seemingly liquid in nature. And while cerebral in concept, the work’s most striking quality is how visceral that transformation appears.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Recycling packaging materials and other discardables, photographer Suzanne Jongmans crafts Renaissance-style portraits that examine contemporary consumption. The artist finds value in these otherwise overlooked materials; elsewhere, she piles clothes and finds beauty in unfinished garments.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Jack Irving’s wearable art carries a texture and movement that take the human body to otherworldly places. In his latest “live installations,” whether on the runway or at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, his works appear to burst from their models. These settings also show how his work functions in both broad daylight and the sets he designs himself.

by Andy SmithPosted on

William Kidd‘s ceramic sculptures imagine lifeforms that don’t exist in our world. The artist attributes the particularly organic appearance of his pieces to “the choice of a low-fire red earthenware clay which is then finished using oxide stains, underglazes, and my signature crawl glaze.” He says that those materials allow the richness and natural vibrancy of his work to shine.

by Andy SmithPosted on

You can now pre-order Hi-Fructose: New Contemporary Fashion in our store here. The book is an experimental look into the worlds of wearable art and fashion, where technology, sculpture, experimental materials, and other-worldly viewpoints have sparked a distinctly different kind of new contemporary fashion that bends genres and sparks new conversations, presenting atypical fashion through a Hi-Fructose lens. Pre-Order today and get an exclusive 18×24″ poster, available only on our site and for pre-orders. The book is published by Cernunnos, and it’s edited and designed by Hi-Fructose co-founder Attaboy.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Colin Raff’s “Perturbatorium” is a collection of unsettling animations and collage work. Recalling the work of Max Ernst or Terry Gilliam, the work has a particular movement because of his “step-frame animation” method. The animations are rooted in Raff’s photo-collage work, which he has described as having “distinct 20th c. antecedents (Heartfield, Ernst, Höch, etc.).”