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Logan Hicks

Logan Hicks, Shepard Fairey, Axel Void, and other artists take part in a look at the modern history of urban art in an exhibit currently running at the Thomas Center Galleries in Gainesville, Fla. “UNCONTAINABLE: Urban Art from Vandalism to Movement,” created with the National Institute of Urban Art, is a survey with 25 globally known artists. And the collection of work offers insight into the varied types of urban art created in every corner.

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New Zealander Tim Molloy crafts strange worlds in his illustrations, comics, and commercial work. Recalling artists like Moebius and Jim Woodring, Molloy’s rich, detailed pieces are packed with surreal imagery. The artist’s tight linework makes his dreamlike narratives into vivid jaunts into the unknown.

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Hula is the moniker of artist Sean Yoro, who creates massive, delicate murals above waterways and alongside abandoned structures. The self-taught painter was raised in Oahu, where he engaged with the ocean as a surfer before embarking on a path in street art and tattooing. Today, he creates his massive figures in oil paint and creates pieces across the world.

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Installation artist Michael Murphy is wowing with his work currently showing at the Wonderspaces pop-up event in San Diego. “Come Together,” an installation made of 2,200 descended parts, appears as a closed fist at certain angles. Murphy uses the phrase “Perceptual Art” to describe his works, which often contain meticulously crafted installations that depend on perspective.

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Texas-born artist Jason Limon moves into even stranger territory with his new acrylic paintings on panel. Several of the artist’s new works implement phrases like “Calling All Numbskulls,” pushing forward an idea that started with his “Three Letter Words” series from last year. Limon was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

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Tennessee native Richard W. James uses ceramics and found objects to create surreal figures and scenes. Using earthenware, fabrics, and underglaze, he forges these characters from materials he associated with his youth. The artist says that in doing this, he “explores the discrepancy between how we, as humans, see ourselves and how we would like others to see us.”