by CaroPosted on

Melbourne, Australia based artist Alex Sanson began sculpting in the early 90s with a series of small, toy-like sculptures greatly inspired by Alexander Calder’s circus, a pioneer of moving sculpture. Since then, Sanson’s repertoire has developed to include both small scale and gigantic kinetic works, some interactive and activated by touch, others hand-operated. His wildly imaginative works have taken Calder’s original output and brought to it a new sense of play and movement.

by CaroPosted on

“I believe that artists should speak about the most desperate and desirable issues for humanity,” says Korean painter Kwon Kyung-Yup. Though known for her realistic portraits of melancholy subjects, first featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 24, Kwon describes herself as a happy person whose paintings are about recalling memories. Her works find an emotional balance between her artistic inspirations, citing the beauty in Klimt’s paintings which she pairs with tragedy, as found in the works of Caravaggio.

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

Charles Gatewood, the prolific San Francisco based visionary and photographer who was called “the family photographer of America’s erotic underground” died early this Thursday morning, April 28th. He had been in the ICU at SF General Hospital after suffering complications from a three-story fall that tragically ended his life at age 74.

by CaroPosted on

He teaches digital media at Los Angeles Harbor College, but that doesn’t deter sculptor Joshua Abarbanel from appreciating a strong tie to nature. His incredible wood sculptures are a reflection of his dual interests in technology and the natural world. Using mix of digital, mechanical tools and handiwork, he first designs his dynamic pieces on the computer, then crafts them by hand in way that feels organic. Recent works combine influences from Romantic landscape, environmental art, and wabi-sabi.

by CaroPosted on

Though Iva Troj’s paintings share the sensibility and feminine grace present in Renaissance era art, her work is informed by her modern point of view. Growing up in the outskirts of Plovdiv, Bulgaria, the now UK-based artist was faced early on with male dominance in a communist country. She often expresses admiration for women artists like Italian Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi, whose mere existence was seen as problematic, while men at the time were painting women to look like dolls. “I so wanted to just go in there and change them all,” she says.

by CaroPosted on

Brazilian twin artists Os Gemeos, Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo, were recently in Milan, Italy, working on a large mural installation for Pirelli HangarBicocca’s new public art project, Outside the Cube. Their mural, titled “Efemero” (ephemeral) features one of their signature, colorful characters climbing up the hangar-shaped building, painted to look like a subway car. The site-specific piece also incorporates logos from international metro systems and personal messages.