by CaroPosted on

On December 13th at 80Forty gallery, Lola will debut her first major exhibition in two years, and perhaps her most personal, “The Younger”. Her new series of twenty oil paintings also includes some of her largest to date. When we visited her studio in Los Angeles this week, she described it as “something to really get lost in”. Her childish characters embark from their storybook lands into unfamiliar territory- Lola’s childhood reality. The spirit of a ‘younger’ Lola is present in images of freckled young girls playing with reimaginatings of toys like Pacman and Pez. In this new world drawn from memory, Lola tells us the story of her creative upbringing. We took a moment to discuss her exhibition while she worked.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Toronto-based artist Winnie Truong (featured on the cover of Hi-Fructose Vol. 22) began drawing unruly, prolific hair as a way to interrogate Western beauty standards. As her body of work evolved, her depictions of hair became more sculptural and intricate. Hair became the medium to test the bounds of form and line. Her latest colored pencil drawings place more emphasis on the abstract arrangements of waves and curls than on the hairstyle’s wearer. Truong’s current solo show, “Invisible/Visible” is on view at Erin Tump Projects in Toronto through December 20.

by CaroPosted on

British digital artist Magnus Gjoen has an unmistakeable style that decorates macabre subjects, previously featured here. It’s jarring but also awe inspiring work that makes you look twice; images of the crucifixion, political figures, and flowery skulls that recall his hey-day at Vivienne Westwood. In recent months, Gjoen has addressed our definition of beauty using opposing symbols of war and high society.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

St. Louis-based artist Cayce Zavaglia (whom we profiled on the blog last year) creates painterly portraits using wool thread as her primary medium. Zavaglia’s works can be viewed from both sides: one, photorealistic and precise and the other, gestural and abstract. The artist says that this duality speaks to the brave face we present to the world and the vulnerability we experience privately. Her latest portraits will be exhibited with Lyons Wier Gallery during Art Miami, December 2 through 7.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Opening November 29 at Feinkunst Krüger in Hamburg, Germany, “Don’t Wake Daddy IX” is a large group show featuring 29 prominent artists influenced by the Low Brow and Pop Surrealism movements. The figurative work in the show largely borrows for pop culture and illustration, focusing on mysterious, bizarre, and often grotesque imagery. Femke Hiemstra, Charlie Immer, Brendan Danielsson, and Ryan Heshka, whom we’ve featured in our print issues, are just a few of the many artists featured. The exhibition will be on view through December 20. Take a look at our preview before the show opens to the public this Saturday.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

John Bisbee envisions his sculptures as drawings in which the 12-inch nails he hammers and welds act like lines in three dimensions. Since his serendipitous discovery of nails’ sculptural potential 30 years ago, Bisbee has been working with the unusual industrial material. His body of work includes organic shapes and architectural constructions alike. The nails act as uniform building blocks that allow him to create rhythmic patterns that echo through much of his work, whether it’s a snake-like floor sculpture, a bird’s nest of bent nails, or a precariously high pyramid.