by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

A large, abandoned Victorian hospital in the heart of Sao Paulo, Cidade Matarazzo became an artists’ playground for the project “Made by Brazilians.” Kenny Scharf, Arne Quinze, Joana Vasconcelos, Charley Case, Saner and others transformed the building with immersive installations in the weeks leading up to the Sao Paulo Biennial. Before plans to remodel the estate are put into effect, viewers are welcome to visit the space through October 11.

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Martin Wittfooth. The Aviary, 2013.

Long Beach Museum of Art presents “Masterworks: Defining A New Narrative” (October 23, 2014 – February 1, 2015) curated by Nathan Spoor and co-curator Jeff McMillan. This is a unique exhibition of 14 large-scale paintings featuring accomplished artists who, for the last decade, have been exploring new narrative directions in painting. Each of the artists have been charged with providing a singular work that could be considered pivotal in their careers. Artists will include Esao Andrews, James Jean, Martin Wittfooth and more.

by Victoria Casal-DataPosted on

English artist Chris Wood creates glass wall-panels that showcase maze-like structures that give the illusion of depth and brilliance through the glass’ interaction with natural and artificial light sources. The artist’s usage of small, reflective, dichroic (meaning “two color”) pieces of glass lets her easily create complex patterns of light and shade; the colors and textures that derive from these structures change in accordance to the position of the viewer and the angle of the light source, making her work an ever-changing, almost magical and intriguing phenomenon.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Berlin-based artist Reka recently travelled to London for his current solo show “Trip the Light” at StolenSpace Gallery (see our preview here) and left a mural behind in the Shoreditch district. While the graceful movements of dancers’ bodies served as the inspiration for the paintings in Reka’s exhibition, the mural took on a more playful, illustrative look despite its shared Modernist aesthetic. Over a black background, Reka painted free-flowing, abstract forms. Some of them emerge as illustrations of specific objects — a fish head, a chess piece with an all-seeing eye — while others keep the viewer asking questions. Is that a spray can with the punk slogan ACAB? The whimsical piece is intended to keep us guessing.

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On Saturday night, KAWS returned to Honor Fraser Gallery with new drawings, paintings, and sculpture in “Man’s Best Friend”. Hundreds lined up to for a chance to meet the artist, and there was no shortage of instagram selfies. The show offers bold abstractions of his favorite cartoon characters, this time Peanuts. KAWS’ technique of superimposing abstract shapes onto his own versions of the characters is almost unreal. Upon close inspection, you won’t find any hint of the artist’s touch. His work is meant to be taken in as a whole, described as a “landscape” that pays homage to animated icons and 1950s American Expressionism.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

While most people’s experiences with animals involve encountering the domesticated or captive sort, DALeast depicts an animal world far from the civilized, cute and cuddly version we humans like to imagine in his current solo show, “The Laten Photon,” at New York City’s Jonathan LeVine Gallery. With his abstracted, high-contrast paintings, the Chinese-born, South African-based artist presents a high-intensity drama of predators and prey. Known for his monochromatic street art, in which gleaming, ribbon-like black lines coalesce into expressionistic animal silhouettes, DAL departed from his typical color palette and worked with rich hues of eggplant, indigo and burgundy in addition to his signature tea-stained linen. The title of the exhibition comes from quantum physics, where the photon is defined as a particle that creates light and makes matter visible to the human eye. The title speaks to DAL’s continual interest in transformation and evolution.