by CaroPosted on

The colorful works of Hawaii native Ekundayo (HF Vol. 9) combine surrealism with influences from his graffiti days. His paintings sometimes lean on the nightmarish, as in his portrayal of anthropomorphic subjects in haunting scenes. On Saturday, he will debut a new series with “Collective Reflections” at Thinkspace gallery in Los Angeles. Ekundayo describes his solo as a “gift to that feeling I know we all connect to when reaching deep within ourselves.” Check out our preview after the jump!

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

An avid enthusiast of mythology and cartography, Toronto-based artist Bailey Henderson sculpts the fearsome sea creatures depicted on medieval and Renaissance-era maps. She brings her bronze sculptures to life with acrylic paint and powdered pigment, creating dimensional versions of the mythical beasts sailors once feared. There’s Ziphius, a bird-faced orca rumored to slice boats in half with its dorsal fin; the cockatrice, a rooster-dragon known to kill by breathing on its victims; and the pinniped, a dog-like seal with protruding tusks. Henderson’s work is often whimsical and humorous, and brings with it a bit of history that makes it all the more fascinating.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Dave Kinsey debuts his new body of work, “Ashes to Ashes,” at Die Kunstagentin in Cologne, Germany on February 5. Known for his bold color palette of deep blues and aquatic teals with jarring, red accents, Kinsey went in an abstract direction with this new series of paintings. While humanoid characters are discernible, Kinsey only creates the slightest semblance of recognizable figures. Dabs of color coalesce into desolate landscapes with seemingly gigantic characters towering overhead. Because of Kinsey’s techniques, the narrative aspect of the work gets muffled and its formal qualities come to the forefront.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Indonesian artist Entang Wiharso explores the complex social milieu of his home country’s multicultural metropolises in his current solo show at Marc Straus Gallery in Manhattan, which is on view through February 8. “I depict the condition of humans who are often divided by complex, multilayered political, ethnic, racial, and religious systems: they co-exist yet their communication is limited and indirect,” wrote Wiharso about the show.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Frida Kahlo is not only an influential 20th-century artist — she’s an icon. Through the often painful, autobiographical threads in her life’s work, fans have come to embrace the late painter as a symbol of fearless self-expression and resilience. San Francisco’s Gauntlet Gallery pays homage to Kahlo with their group show, “Thank God It’s Frida,” which opens on January 31. Artists such as Valentin Fischer, David Slone, JeanPaul Mallozzi, Cheyenne Randall, Ruben Ireland, and many others paid homage to Kahlo’s brazen spirit and personal style with portraits of the artist. Alongside the exhibition, San Francisco artist D Young V will also debut his site-specific installation, “Forward Motion,” which takes over part of the gallery with floor-to-ceiling murals filled with D Young V’s signature, propaganda-style imagery.

by Nastia VoynovskayaPosted on

Jacob Dahlgren treats stacks of pencils like blocks of wood in his sculpture series, “Subject of Art.” With each unit sharpened to a different length, the pencils stack on top of one another to create playful, geometric shapes with an Op Art element. Though the forms are quite simple, Dahlgren’s choice of medium makes the series a whimsical exploration of how one can reconfigure basic shapes to creates something new.