by CaroPosted on

Next Friday, La Luz de Jesus gallery in Hollywood will dot their walls with thousands of coasters for the third year in a row. As most artists will tell you, it is the smallest works that are the most challenging to create. In the case of the Coaster Show, where the coasters measure 4″ inches round, they require confidence in one’s technique and precision. Their sizes aren’t the only aspect of the show that is small. The affordability of the works attracted hundreds of fans to last year’s show, who scrambled to get a piece by one of their favorite artists. This year, that list includes well-known names alongside emerging talents.

by Roxanne GoldbergPosted on

Based in Milford, Pennsylvania, Lindsay Ketterer Gates is interested in fine detail and the creative potential within even the most miniscule and mundane objects. The artist is most well known for her technique of weaving stainless-steel mesh. To counter the harshness of the material, Gates draws on her interest in fashion to create soft, feminine lines in objects such as baskets and teapots. In a recent series, Gates wove pistachio shells into the stainless screening of a small-scaled decorative object in the shape of a Japanese Kimono.

by CaroPosted on

French based artist duo Ella & Pitr, first featured on our Tumblr, create largescale aerial murals of children’s book-inspired characters. Unless you have a birds eye view, it’s difficult to appreciate the scope of the majority of their works, which can be found on rooftops, airplane runways, and even huge grassy fields. Their latest mural is not only their largest, it is also the largest outdoor mural in the world to date at 226,040 square feet.

by CaroPosted on

Japanese artist Shintaro Ohata places sculptures in front of paintings to create wondrous scenes inspired by childhood. They play out every day encounters between his child subjects, their pets and imaginary friends with the world around them. While their lives may seem ordinary for the most part, Ohata’s playful and impressionistic style make them feel like fantasies. They are sculpted from polystyrene which are then painted to perfectly match their traditional 2D acrylic backgrounds.

by CaroPosted on

Hi-Fructose Vol 27 featured artist Dan Quintana will debut new works this Saturday at Hashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco with “Diffused”. In addition to a new series of oil paintings, the exhibit will also feature several charcoal drawings and a largescale mural. Quintana’s work is known for his detailed images of ephemeral subjects of goddesses and demons that seem to dissolve into their surroundings. Often, his works are layered with ominous narratives and recurring personal symbolism. In the tradition of his aesthetic, “Diffused” portrays dissipating ghost-like figures in images that personify death.

by CaroPosted on

Portuguese multimedia artist Gustavo Fernandes portrays a parallel universe in his oil paintings. According to this essay on his work, Fernandes had a difficult childhood and once referred to himself as someone who had lost his roots. Roots are a recurring motif in his more surreal paintings, where grape vines grab hold of mysterious objects, such as spheres, and perform a strange balancing act between earth and water.