by CaroPosted on

It’s a common belief that twins share some sort of unexplained mental, even spiritual connection. Identical twin brothers and artists How and Nosm (Raoul and Davide Perre) were raised together and also sharing the passion for art, have a connection and dynamic that is unique. It certainly explains their highly singular vision: dynamic artworks and massive, global murals that are instantly recognizable for their use of red, black and white based imagery featuring intricate patterns and shapes.

by CaroPosted on

For Toronto based artist Brian Donnelly, featured here, painting is a risky business. At first beautifully rendered in oil, he then sprays his subjects with turpentine and hand sanitizer until their faces are distorted beyond recognition, to a more limited expression. Donnelly’s work is all about embracing limitations: “I ask a lot of questions about art and how we define it,” he says. “How far away from the original state can we go before we stop calling something art? In the process, I end up drawing a parallel between the fragile nature of artwork and the human condition.”

by CaroPosted on

Carole A. Feuerman’s hyperrealistic sculptures of graceful human subjects like swimmers, divers, and dancers, featured here, are undeniably lifelike. But they are also magical in their dreamy state. Her sculptures also capture something that isn’t real in the tangible sense, and that is the soul and emotion of a living person. Some call it “super-realism”, but in Feuerman’s words: “My sculptures combine both reality and illusion- I’m idealizing the human form, its not life as it really is.”

by CaroPosted on

Klaus Enrique is a New York based photographer whose work parallels Italian painter Giuseppe Arcimboldo and has come to adopt the term “Arcimboldist” for his expression. His creepy, amusing, nevertheless stunning portraits capture subjects made from real objects, fruits, and vegetables that realize Arcimboldo’s paintings in real life. At first glance, it might appear as though Enrique’s work is created digitally, but they are actually photographs of sculptures made out of real organic elements, also making Enrique a sculptor.

by Hi-Fructose StaffPosted on

Tickets on sale now!

Tickets are now available for the Turn the Page: The First Ten Years of Hi-Fructose opening night celebration, coming to Virginia MOCA this May! Turn the Page will be inaugurated with a premiere extravaganza shrouded in mystery and inspiring wonder. Cocktails, dinner, and entertainment begin the evening in an edgy, but sophisticated surreal forest. Emerging from the surreal forest, guests will enjoy the first private curatorial tours of the awaited exhibition: Turn the Page, featuring 51 of the foremost artists of our time from the ten year history of Hi-Fructose Magazine.

by CaroPosted on

Melbourne, Australia based artist Alex Sanson began sculpting in the early 90s with a series of small, toy-like sculptures greatly inspired by Alexander Calder’s circus, a pioneer of moving sculpture. Since then, Sanson’s repertoire has developed to include both small scale and gigantic kinetic works, some interactive and activated by touch, others hand-operated. His wildly imaginative works have taken Calder’s original output and brought to it a new sense of play and movement.