by Andy SmithPosted on

Even when taken out of narrative context, the illustrations of Nicolás Arispe captivate viewers. The Buenos Aires artist has crafted comics, books, album covers, magazine illustrations, animation storyboard, and much more. He’s known, in particular, for his anthropomorphic characters and fantastical settings, all tackling decidedly human and emotional stories.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Zachary Eastwood-Bloom takes the idea of adding digital-like glitches to traditional sculptures to a visceral level. He created most of these sculptures while he was sculptor-in-residence at Pangolin London. He uses both digital and analogue means to craft the final product, unifying several disciplines for a startling end result.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Kushana Bush is known for her packed, figurative gouache paintings, with influences from traditional Mughal and Persian miniatures, the Italian Renaissance, Japanese ukiyo-e, and beyond converging. Recent work takes a singular—yet still dynamic—approach. The New Zealand artist infuses contemporary reflections and interactions into each corner of her works, each containing several narratives worth investigating.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Bruno Weber was a master of crafting fantastical creatures, and there’s no greater example than the 220,000-square-foot sculpture garden bearing his name in his native Switzerland, visited by thousands each year. Inside this magical park, nestled in Spreitenbach and Dietikon, visitors can scale and interact with its inhabitants. Here, artist Angie Mason shares photos from her recent visit there.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Ray Harryhausen, the father of the enormously influential style of stop-motion called “Dynamation,” will be honored at exhibition at Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in 2020, his famous creature models escaping the archives and on display. The first glimpses of these restored figures were revealed to mark his 99th birthday. Harryhausen, who passed away in 2013, influenced stop-motion artists such as Henry Selick and Phil Tippett, as well as directors George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, and J.J. Abrams.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Though the creatures of Claudio Romo are bizarre and at times, frightening, the illustrator’s distinct linework gives each a certain elegance. The Chile-based artist has produced a number of books carrying his strange monsters and plantlife (among them, the beautifully titled “The Book of Imprudent Flora”). Through often carrying no specific timeline, his practice has also extended into the futuristic, as evidenced below.