by Andy SmithPosted on


Kadriye İnal’s “patchwork” paper sculptures capture humanity in both form and the imperfect, abstract beauty found in our seams. The artist’s work has also been called collage, though she has said that it exists “somewhere between three and two dimensions, between reality and fiction.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

The strain of imaginary realism found in Carrie Pearce’s oil paintings calls upon both 16th-century masters and the drawing style of the children she’s depicting. The artist says she creates “emotional portraits,” rather than just portraits of people. She says her paintings are “aimed to entertain you and convey events real or imagined through images, improvisation and embellishment.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

In Alex Chinneck’s recent work, the sculptor bends and warps otherwise stubborn objects to his will. “Growing up gets me down” is a working oak grandfather clock “knotted” by Chinneck. “Birth, death and a midlife crisis” was an indoor sculpture that “tied a 450-year-old column in the German museum of Kirchheim Unter Teck.” The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

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New York artist Maria Kreyn saw her U.K. debut this month with a show “staged at a secret location in the heart of Soho, London.” Organized by Heist Gallery, the chapel-set “Polyphony” assembles oil paintings and sound installations, composed by David Triana, for two of her paintings. The show runs through May 29 at the space. Kreyn was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Colombia-based illustrator Alejandro García Restrepo is known for crafting strikingly realistic and strange drawings, often playing with the contours of natural objects to create surprising flourishes. Though many of his works have been illustrative in nature, they often stand alone as stirring works.

by Andy SmithPosted on

This June, Kazuki Takamatsu kicks off a double solo show at both locations of Dorothy Circus Gallery, in Rome and London. “For Tomorrow” collects new paintings that bridge analog and digital art, crafting gouache and acrylic layers that recreate figures first imagined using 3-D software. The artist uses this method to also tether both Eastern and Western culture. Takamatsu recently created the cover for the Hi-Fructose Collected 4 Box Set.