by Andy SmithPosted on

South Africa-born, Mexico-based painter Christiaan Conradie mixes abstraction and the figurative, injecting delicate realism, otherworldly forms, and sculptural elements into the canvas. Influences like Rembrandt, Twombly, and Rubens are part of an ongoing dialogue in Conradie’s work.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Christopher David White says that “human is to nature as skin is to bark – as roots are to veins.” The artist’s striking ceramic sculptures attempt to reconcile humanity’s rightful relationship with the natural world, one long abandoned for consumption and convenience. The artist was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Artist Sean Landers blends varying styles in his paintings, using both surrealism and references to art history to toy with the viewers’ expectations. The artist uses sculpture, photography, drawing, and other approaches to accomplish this, yet in his paintings, he takes a particularly surreal approach to reveal “the process of artistic creation through humor and confession, gravity and pathos.”

by Andy SmithPosted on

Firelei Baez blends an array of techniques and materials to explore culture and femininity. Often using the figurative form as a base, she subverts the viewers’ expectations by implementing several textures, patterns, and materials. The artist says that her massive, meticulously crafted works on paper are “intrinsically indebted to a rigorous studio practice.” Baez was last mentioned on HiFructose.com here.

by Andy SmithPosted on


Young Chun

It’s the 46th volume of Hi-Fructose!

Featured in this issue are …
Craig Gleason‘s drawings of Bad Guys, the badass quilts of Ben Venom, the super saccharine starlet paintings of cover artist Young Chun, the art and murals of Koralie, Ryan Heshka‘s Mean Girls Club, the distorted and demented baby sculptures of Johnson Tsang, the surreal paintings of Horacio Quiroz, and the outstanding drawings of Sverre Malling. Plus multi-page reviews of the new monograph by Todd Schorr and Ernst Haekel.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Riccardo Mayr carefully adds elements and characters from the Star Wars franchise to original oil paintings from the 17th and 18th centuries. A new show, “Religious Paintings of the Expanded Galaxy,” collects these works at Gallery 30 South in Pasadena. The gallery says one goal is to “present religious faith and ethics in a post-modern paradigm largely embedded in fictional reality through a multi-generational exposure and fascination with successful science fiction movies.”