by Margot BuermannPosted on


In what the artist himself calls “homespun faerie tales”, Jon Rappleye blends imagery found in art history, literature, biology, and folklore to portray the cyclical nature of life and death. Ranging from surreal paintings to mixed media sculptures, his works draw from the detailed illustrations of James John Audubon and hallucinatory worlds of Salvador Dalí. And while his subject matter can be grim at times, the artist renders it in such a way that it becomes beautiful and enchanting.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Chilean artist Alonsa Guevara’s upcoming solo exhibition at Anna Zorina Gallery in New York City, titled Ceremonies, honors life’s varying stages with renderings of “imaginary rites.” Humans, harvests, and lands are among those celebrated in the exhibition, as a collection of oil paintings on canvas. The show runs Sept. 1 through Oct. 1.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Paris-born Ugo Gattoni’s detailed cityscapes and otherworldly scenes and objects have garnered international attention. Much of his work is rendered through graphite, ink, or pencil, through the artist has also delved into colorful animation and product design in recent years.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Cape Town artist Michael Amery shares his concerns about human impact on the environment in his series of drawings, Trees by Man. In charcoal, pen and India ink, the artist depicts forests grown for commercial use, much like the ones found in his native South Africa. A graphic designer with a background in advertising, Amery is interested in how consumerist culture is tied to man’s exploitation of the natural world and its effects on our planet’s vulnerable ecosystems.

by Margot BuermannPosted on


Whether they’re her bug-eyed, psychedelic deities or creatures made of brightly colored fruits, Mi Ju’s curious creations have us looking at both the big and small picture. On the surface, her characters float through seemingly chaotic worlds buzzing with wild energy. A closer look reveals a whole universe of tiny, emoji-like faces, animals and flora that together make up the larger image. It’s through this simultaneous macro- and microscopic lens that the artist presents her colorful, absorbing environments. Find more of her work on Tumblr and Instagram.

by Andy SmithPosted on

Alex Achaval, a Seattle-based painter, often adheres wooden paint brushes or other objects to his canvases before beginning portraits. The artist said this idea was sparked when he spotted a truck painted to blend into a wall. “I like to incorporate these objects into my work to represent the obstacles we have to overcome in life,” Achaval says, in a statement.