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Ray Harryhausen’s Restored Models Revealed on 99th Birthday

Ray Harryhausen, the father of the enormously influential style of stop-motion called "Dynamation," will be honored at exhibition at Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in 2020, his famous creature models escaping the archives and on display. The first glimpses of these restored figures were revealed to mark his 99th birthday. Harryhausen, who passed away in 2013, influenced stop-motion artists such as Henry Selick and Phil Tippett, as well as directors George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, and J.J. Abrams.


Skeleton models from Jason and the Argonauts, 1963 by Ray Harryhausen (1920-2013)
Collection: The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation (Charity No. SC001419)
© The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation
Photography: Sam Drake (National Galleries of Scotland)

Ray Harryhausen, the father of the enormously influential style of stop-motion called “Dynamation,” will be honored at exhibition at Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art in 2020, his famous creature models escaping the archives and on display. The first glimpses of these restored figures were revealed to mark his 99th birthday. Harryhausen, who passed away in 2013, influenced stop-motion artists such as Henry Selick and Phil Tippett, as well as directors George Lucas, Steven Spielberg, and J.J. Abrams.


Medusa model from Clash of the Titans, c.1979 by Ray Harryhausen (1920-2013)
Collection: The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation (Charity No. SC001419)
© The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation


Ray Harryhausen (1920-2013) animating Skeleton model (The 7th Voyage of Sinbad, 1958)
© The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation (Charity No. SC001419)


Model of Skeleton from Jason and the Argonauts, c.1961 by Ray Harryhausen (1920-2013). Mounted on wooden base.
Collection: The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation (Charity No. SC001419)
© The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation

Simon Groom, director of Modern and Contemporary Art at the National Galleries of Scotland, commented on the upcoming exhibit: “It’s an amazing experience to watch being brought back to life some of the most famous mythical creatures from the history of cinema. We are thrilled to be working with Vanessa and The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation on putting together the largest and most spectacular exhibition to date celebrating the life and work of Ray Harryhausen, titan of cinema.”

Find the The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation on the web here. Photos taken by Sam Drake (National Galleries of Scotland).


Armature of Cyclops from ‘The 7th Voyage of Sinbad’, stripped of latex. On wooden base by Ray Harryhausen (1920-2013)
Collection: The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation (Charity No. SC001419)
© The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation


Model of the Kraken from Clash of the Titans, c.1980 by Ray Harryhausen (1920-2013)
Collection: The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation (Charity No. SC001419)
© The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation


Model of Kali by Ray Harryhausen (1920-2013) from The Golden Voyage of Sinbad, c.1973
Collection: The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation (Charity No. SC001419)
© The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation


Model Minaton from Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger, c.1975 by Ray Harryhausen (1920-2013)
Collection: The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation (Charity No. SC001419)
© The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation


Model Talos from Jason and the Argonauts, c.1962 by Ray Harryhausen (1920-2013)
Collection: The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation (Charity No. SC001419)
© The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation


Copy resin model Allosaurus from One Million Years B.C. c. 1965 by Ray Harryhausen (1920-2013)
Collection: The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation (Charity No. SC001419)
© The Ray and Diana Harryhausen Foundation

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