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The Recent Immersive Installations of Tracey Snelling

Tracey Snelling's installations are immersive blends of sculpture, video, and photography, her makeshift buildings containing surprises in their windows and corners. Her recent, massive construction at the 58th Venice Biennale reflects on her experiences living in China, in particular. Videos shown within offer peeks into her experiences with friends; structures are inspired by actual places she visited.

Tracey Snelling’s installations are immersive blends of sculpture, video, and photography, her makeshift buildings containing surprises in their windows and corners. Her recent, massive construction at the 58th Venice Biennale reflects on her experiences living in China, in particular. Videos shown within offer peeks into her experiences with friends; structures are inspired by actual places she visited.

https://www.instagram.com/p/By8rqrKhtrd/

“Tracey Snelling gathers information through the process of wandering, observing, participating, and documenting,” the project says. “Not concerned with exact replication, Snelling creates a China-inspired world comprised of her own images and video, as well as found media, including a Chongqing rap video by the artist’s friend Jin Cheng. She gathers props and paraphernalia, placing trophies and Tsingtao beer cans on a large tenement of buildings, transforming it into a display case for her souvenirs.”

See more of her work below and other projects on her site.

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