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Iris van Herpen’s New Collection Inspired by Anthony Howe’s Kinetic Sculptures

For her new collection, Iris van Herpen collaborated with kinetic sculptor Anthony Howe, with riveting results on the runway. "Hypnosis" features several new pieces from van Herpen, who was featured on our site here. She says that Howe’s “Ominverse” sculpture serves as a “portal” into the collection.

For her new collection, Iris van Herpen collaborated with kinetic sculptor Anthony Howe, with riveting results on the runway. “Hypnosis” features several new pieces from van Herpen, who was featured on our site here. She says that Howe’s “Ominverse” sculpture serves as a “portal” into the collection.

“The spherical ‘Omniverse’ sculpture, made by the extraordinary sculptor Anthony Howe, created meditative movement on the runway of the new ‘Hypnosis’ collection, encircling a state of hypnosis,” Iris writes. “Expressing a universal life cycle, it explores our relationship with nature and intertwines with infinite expansion and contraction. We are deeply thankful to have collaborated with Anthony Howe for the past five months on both the ‘Omniverse’ sculpture and the ‘Infinity’ finale dress. The dress comes alive on the breath of a finely balanced mechanism.”

Find van Herpen on the web here.

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