Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

The Kinetic Sculptures of Casey Curran

Casey Curran's kinetic sculptures consist of wire, aluminum, motors, sculpted brass, cranks, or other materials, yet resemble organic objects in essence. The artist, hailing from Washington, crafts his intricate works with the cycles and shapes of nature in mind, yet each sculpture doesn’t seem to draw from any one creature or floral element.

Casey Curran‘s kinetic sculptures consist of wire, aluminum, motors, sculpted brass, cranks, or other materials, yet resemble organic objects in essence. The artist, hailing from Washington, crafts his intricate works with the cycles and shapes of nature in mind, yet each sculpture doesn’t seem to draw from any one creature or floral element.

“I invite the viewer to become a part of the work through participation, animating a tableau of flora and fauna that bloom or flutter to life when activated,” the artist says. “When conceiving my pieces I center on a hidden narrative and begin to assign visual elements that align with the concept of the piece, often utilizing ornate structures and simple construction methods to further highlight my interests in foundation and form. In the process of creating I look for patterns in nature and symmetry in ecosystems. I look for how innovation shapes itself into our ever expanding systems of complexity and knowledge.”

See more of Curran’s work below.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Courtney Mattison’s ceramics are clearly inspired and motivated by the ocean — that immense, powerful and precious resource whose details are still largely hidden from us. Self-identifying as both an artist and “ocean advocate," Mattison has created massive installations, “Our Changing Seas, I-III,” that cover a bio-diverse selection of coral reef forms. Displayed in a gallery, the pieces appear to grow out of the wall, as if miraculously alive in the dry, alien atmosphere. The ceramic medium allows for remarkable ranges in color, spanning the spectrum of actual living coral to the bone-dry, matte whiteness of its dead state. Both versions are present in Mattison’s pieces, reminding us that these entities are desperately in need of preservation. "Our Changing Seas III" is currently on view at the Tang Museum at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, NY.
Chinese sculptor Liu Xue creates human-animal hybrids that are both elegant and disturbing, displaying a range of emotions between acceptance and anxiety in their existences. A man-pig appears in anguish; a man-walrus exudes confidence and defiance.
The wooden sculptures of Kiko Miyares appear as distortions of the human figure, with viewers often circling the work in disbelief. While some of his work is horizontal, the majority of his work vertically transforms the body into a new, perception-challenging object. His toying with color further pushes the surrealism of each subject.
Isaac Cordal has been leaving his sculptures of tiny cement figures in cities all over the world for years. Featured on our blog, his artworks hidden in plain sight feature gloomy people wading helplessly in puddles, other times peering through cracks in the sidewalk and concrete walls. They are part of an ongoing series that he calls "Cement Eclipses". Cordal explains, "Cement Eclipses is a critical definition of our behavior as a social mass. The art work intends to catch the attention on our devalued relation with the nature through a critical look to the collateral effects of our evolution." The Spanish artist recently updated his site with his latest works, installed in New York City in November.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List