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The Scene-Filled Painted Portraits of Cristian Blanxer

In Cristian Blanxer’s painted portraits, dynamic scenes inhabit the contours of the human form. This framing device offers a look at humanity on two fronts: one in the face of danger or hardship and another in more quiet, solitary moments.

In Cristian Blanxer’s painted portraits, dynamic scenes inhabit the contours of the human form. This framing device offers a look at humanity on two fronts: one in the face of danger or hardship and another in more quiet, solitary moments.

“The hunger for new paths discovery, spontaneous brush stroke and the intensity in the colour perception are reflected in all his works,” Cass Contemporary says. “The impressionist light and the poetical beat of the expressive stain define Blanxer’s creative rut. Most of his works reproduce human actions, from ordinary to more surrealistic situations. Nevertheless, he seems to be as impartial as possible leaving the emotions arise freely. Therefore, in the middle of his learning process, Blanxer shows us a constantly evolving work.”

See more of his work below.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BvTq_Nvh4Lc/

https://www.instagram.com/p/BvLqx-nBx_g/

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