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Kevin Peterson Returns to Thinkspace with ‘Wild’

In Kevin Peterson’s new show at Thinkspace Projects, child subjects are paired with sentient animals, unlikely castaways against desolate urban backdrops. "Wild," collecting new vivid paintings from the artist, show these subjects “interchangeably as beacons of hope and symbols of dispossession.” The show runs March 2 through March 23. (Peterson was last featured on HiFructose.com here.)

In Kevin Peterson’s new show at Thinkspace Projects, child subjects are paired with sentient animals, unlikely castaways against desolate urban backdrops. “Wild,” collecting new vivid paintings from the artist, show these subjects “interchangeably as beacons of hope and symbols of dispossession.” The show runs March 2 through March 23. (Peterson was last featured on HiFructose.com here.)

“In spite of seemingly bleak, if not potentially catastrophic, circumstances, the isolated child protagonists in Peterson’s works, bereft amidst modern-day ruins save for the companionship of their wild, bestial cohort, are calm, peaceful, and strangely emancipated,” Thinkspace says. “A feeling of persistence and salvage dominate these visual metaphors for human survival; life, in the end, persists in its way and under the most iniquitous and impossible conditions.”

See more works from the show below.

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