The Monochromatic Illusions of Darel Carey

by Andy SmithPosted on

Darel Carey takes something as simple as a line and creates new worlds and dimensions. The artist says that the work is partially intended to transform the space it inhabits, taking a flat surface and crafting entirely new depth. His projects have recently appeared in the Museum of Selfies, Edwardsville Arts Center, and other spaces. These spacial explorations share a kinship with the work of Felipe Pantone and others who alter everyday canvases.

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Wave function disruption 〰️

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“A line on its own is simple,” the artist says. “When combined with more lines in a consistent, precise manner, the lines become more than just the lines. They form something more complex. On a two-dimensional space, a flat surface, many lines juxtaposed in varying distances at different points can be perceived as three-dimensional. In a three-dimensional space, following a similar concept, lines moving from the floor to the wall to the ceiling can appear to occupy space in mid-air from various vantage points, which creates a perceived topographical space, transforming the visualized landscape of an area.”

See more of his work below.

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Have the confidence to make unorthodox choices. I’ve learned over the years to trust my decisions. • When I wanted to get out of the Air Force to pursue an art career, everyone told me I was making a mistake, I was already 11 years in with a nice set career, and getting out now to pursue “art” would be a stupid move. I got out anyway because I knew that was what I needed to do. • When I chose the fine arts department at art school, everyone told me I was making a mistake, digital is the future, and that’s where all the jobs are.. fine art is a dead end. I chose fine art anyway because I wanted to explore and discover my interest and path in art. • When I was in the fine arts department, my peers and professors shunned me and said I didn’t “need” to be there because I was already good at rendering, while at the same time my rendering ability was dismissed as “good draftsmanship, not art” in the fine arts department.. “why not go to digital?” I stayed in the department anyway, and continued to pursue the directions I thought I needed to. • When I accepted commissions from big companies like T-Mobile, Adidas, and Google, people told me I was making a mistake, I was commercializing what should be art for art’s sake, in essence selling out. I ignored this criticism and chose carefully who I wanted to work with and what kinds of projects I wanted to take. • When I turned down commissions for projects I didn’t feel fit my path, people told me I was making a mistake, why turn down money and new opportunities, ride the wave while it’s here or I’ll regret it. I turned things down anyway, my plan is not to be on a wave, I want to navigate the ocean. • When I use black and white, people think I should use color. When I use color, people think I should stick to black and white… • Bottom line_____________ Have the confidence to make unorthodox decisions. Know when to take advice and when not to. People don’t understand what you’re doing or thinking as well as you do, and everyone’s experience and context is unique. The right move for someone isn’t the right move for everyone, and the wrong move to everyone may be the best move for someone.

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