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The Narrative Drawings of So PineNut

Tokyo artist So PineNut’s stirring drawings pull from spiritual influences. Often referencing figures and narratives from the Bible, the works carry darker Judeo-Christian themes rendered with both ancient and contemporary characters. The artist's practice includes these graphite works, plus painting, graphic novels, printmaking, pottery, and more.

Tokyo artist So PineNut’s stirring drawings pull from spiritual influences. Often referencing figures and narratives from the Bible, the works carry darker Judeo-Christian themes rendered with both ancient and contemporary characters. The artist’s practice includes these graphite works, plus painting, graphic novels, printmaking, pottery, and more.

Familiar tales conveyed in some way include the Garden of Eden, Babel, and Noah’s Ark. The artist’s identifying text with works offers clues into otherwise surrealist imagery. On the artist’s Instagram accounts, he offers insights into the creation of these series, with both process photos and examinations of the detailed corners of a given work.

See more work by the artist below.

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