Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Joe Reginella’s Memorial Statues Mark Fictional Disasters in NYC

New York sculptor Joe Reginella has fooled countless tourists with his statues scattered across the city, marking events that never actually happened. From a Staten Island Ferry encounter with an octopus to a New York Harbor UFO encounter, the artist’s scenarios use the convincing device of the memorial statue to relay his narratives.

New York sculptor Joe Reginella has fooled countless tourists with his statues scattered across the city, marking events that never actually happened. From a Staten Island Ferry encounter with an octopus to a New York Harbor UFO encounter, the artist’s scenarios use the convincing device of the memorial statue to relay his narratives.

Each statue has its own website, with a backstory, souvenir shop, and tour offers in tow. From the ferry disaster site: “It was close to 4am on the quiet morning of November 22, 1963 when the Steam Ferry Cornelius G. Kolff vanished without a trace. On its way with nearly 400 hundred people, mostly on their way to work, the disappearance of the Cornelius G. Kolff remains both one of New York’s most horrific maritime tragedies and perhaps its most intriguing mystery. Eye witness accounts describe “large tentacles” which “pulled” the ferry beneath the surface only a short distance from its destination at Whitehall Terminal in Lower Manhattan.”

See more of his works, including one “event” involving a Brooklyn Bridge elephant stampede, below.



Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
London based sculptor Rachel Kneebone is well known for her complex porcelain pieces that contain writhing groupings of human figures. Her work has been described as depicting an "erotic state of flux" and "celebrating forms of transgression, beauty and seduction," influenced by ancient Greek and Roman myths and also the modern human experience- you can find aspects of change, death, growth, renewal, and lust dissolved together in her individual pieces.
Yayoi Kusama's art is in London this month as part of a new exhibition at the Victoria Miro gallery. Her internationally known work is obsessive and overwhelming, presenting the world as a polka-dotted dream land, featured in Hi-Fructose Vol 25. The word "extraordinary" is overused in writing about contemporary art but we can make an exception for Kusama, who has been selected as one of TIME Magazine's World's 100 Most Influential People for conquering both the art and fashion world. "Dots are a symbol of the world, the cosmos; the earth is a dot. The sun, the moon, the stars are all made up of dots. You and me, we are dots," she once said.
Combining his own creativity and digital techniques, Dutch artist Bert Simons makes incredibly lifelike sculptures of the people around him out of paper. His paper portraits share an uncanny resemblance, and as the technology has improved over the years, so has the quality of the Rotterdam-based artist's works. Each portrait first begins with outlining his subject in little black dots (a "dot per dot" reference method) that are then scanned into the open source cad program Bender to create a "map" of the face, to which he applies color and texture. Simons then prints a flat rendering that is like a little work of art in its own right, a mask that he painstakingly cuts and glues back together again into the pieces you see here.
British artist James Lake first began to use cardboard in his work after losing his leg to bone cancer 20 years ago, finding strength and versatility in this unlikely, yet readily available material. In a new video from Rajapack, Lake recalls his story and shows a bit of his process. Lake used Earth Overshoot Day as inspiration for a sculpture that "shows the size the earth would need to be to support the speed we are consuming the Earth’s resources. At the centre of the sculpture sits the Earth, and encasing half of it is a shell 1.7 times larger."

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List