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Interactive, Disturbing Sculptures of Mireia Donat Melús

The disturbing, seemingly organic forms created by Mireia Donat Melús take on an interactive edge with works like “Trou,” an installation that invites the viewer’s hand into the work and shows its exploration using an interior camera. His sculptures, made from nylon and empty silicone fiber, appear to be both human-grown and alien in nature.

The disturbing, seemingly organic forms created by Mireia Donat Melús take on an interactive edge with works like “Trou,” an installation that invites the viewer’s hand into the work and shows its exploration using an interior camera. His sculptures, made from nylon and empty silicone fiber, appear to be both human-grown and alien in nature.


“‘Trou’ is an interactive installation project that, set in a medical-related environment, invites the public to examine an unknown object,” the statement says, as translate from Spanish. “A mole of nylon and miraguano rests on a large aluminum table, its strong physical body stirring our senses. This conglomerate report of fleshy appearance encourages us to delve into the intriguing orifice that, treasuring the great appearance of a great anus, presides over its front. ‘Trou’ plays the transcorporeality, the indiscernibility of the inside / outside, the unclean and the acceptable. An internal camera waits for the intrusive hand that fractures this barrier between the public and the private and in situ monitors it by giving witness of a spectator who is satiated in his desire to interrupt an internal passivity and rediscover the organic.”

See other sculptures and photos from the artist below.


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