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Karine Rougier’s Mystical ‘Wild Waves In Our Hands’

Karine Rougier’s mystical "Wild waves in our hands" touches both on our tribal nature and explores femininity. The show is staged at Catinca Tabacaru Gallery in New York City throughout the month. On the show, the gallery says this: “Women are Rougier’s muses; poetry her nourishment: an ode to Ingeborg Bachmann, Rainer Maria Rilke, les Métamorphoses d’Ovide.”

Karine Rougier’s mystical “Wild waves in our hands” touches both on our tribal nature and explores femininity. The show is staged at Catinca Tabacaru Gallery in New York City throughout the month. On the show, the gallery says this: “Women are Rougier’s muses; poetry her nourishment: an ode to Ingeborg Bachmann, Rainer Maria Rilke, les Métamorphoses d’Ovide.”

“Rougier is fascinated by hands; human hands, but not always so,” a statement says. “These carry emotion; they are the first place for contact, and for drawing. A hand is an independent character: acting, holding, embracing bodies. Sharing wild feelings. Feeling the heartbeat. Miniature paintings and expressionist grigris abound in minute details make up this first solo show with the gallery, which pushes us deep into emotional sensuality and mystical experience.”

See more work from the show below.

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