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Marc Scheff’s New, Layered Works Shown in ‘Depth Charge’

Marc Scheff layers paint, pencil and gold leaf in poured resin and shows “the parts of ourselves we want seen and the parts we prefer to keep to ourselves.” A new show from the artist at Haven Gallery, titled "Depth Charge," collects several of these works. It opens on May 19 and runs through June 23 at the Long Island gallery.

Marc Scheff layers paint, pencil and gold leaf in poured resin and shows “the parts of ourselves we want seen and the parts we prefer to keep to ourselves.” A new show from the artist at Haven Gallery, titled “Depth Charge,” collects several of these works. It opens on May 19 and runs through June 23 at the Long Island gallery.

A statement says that the works “offer a multi dimensional look at what makes each one of us who we are; through our stories, experiences, emotions and connections … The individuals Scheff depicts are portrayed amongst shapes, colors and expression; each element of design intertwines to provide a glimpse into who these people are, where they have been, their fears, their comforts, their love and their person, all as extensions of ourselves.”

See more works from the show below.


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