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HNin Nie’s Vulnerable ‘Post Feels’ Series

HNin Nie’s vulnerable and humorous paintings tackle the spectrum of emotions through the character Negative Nancy. The works are part of the ongoing “Post Feels” series, with both comic-style pieces and larger canvas scenes. Her work was recently featured in the Southern Tiger Collective show Xōchitl, an all-female show in North Carolina.

HNin Nie’s vulnerable and humorous paintings tackle the spectrum of emotions through the character Negative Nancy. The works are part of the ongoing “Post Feels” series, with both comic-style pieces and larger canvas scenes. Her work was recently featured in the Southern Tiger Collective show Xōchitl, an all-female show in North Carolina.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BdiRMrrlY76/?taken-by=thepostfeels

Nie explains her ongoing project in a statement: “Post Feels is the exploratory study of human emotions,” it says. “HNin Nie uses paint as her medium to portray emotions through Negative Nancy. HNin is inspired by the people around her that discover self-love by encouraging vulnerability. Both HNin and Nancy channel their negativity into something greater.”

The artist also maintains separate practices in photography and filmmaking. See more of the artist’s work in the “Post Feels” series below.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BPAnJkMAqkn/?taken-by=hninstagram

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