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Oscar Oiwa’s Newest Installation in Marker Pen

Oscar Oiwa’s latest 360-degree drawing, “Paradise,” is hosted in Japan House in São Paulo. The Brazil-born artist is known for both his immersive installations and his canvas pieces, with the artist’s work on display at the space until June 3. The artist used 120 marker pens inside of an inflatable dome to create the new work.


Oscar Oiwa’s latest 360-degree drawing, “Paradise,” is hosted in Japan House in São Paulo. The Brazil-born artist is known for both his immersive installations and his canvas pieces, with the artist’s work on display at the space until June 3. The artist used 120 marker pens inside of an inflatable dome to create the new work.

“His works show a visual interplay of cross-cultural influences from his Japanese heritage and traditions, contemporary manga as well as western impressionism and science fiction film,” A Connoisseur Contemporary statement says. “Oiwa’s works are striking in their portrayal of multiple viewpoints and objects which combine effortlessly into a vivid world of their own.”

See another one of his installation pieces, from 2016, below.

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