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Cristina Córdova’s Stirring Ceramic Sculptures

Cristina Córdova’s stirring ceramic sculptures explore the iconography of differing cultures and social ideas while tethering all of humankind. At varying scales, these pieces are striking in their confrontations with the viewers, recalling both the familiar and a broad spirituality in their execution. Each of the figurative pieces contain multiple explorations, the artist says.

Cristina Córdova’s stirring ceramic sculptures explore the iconography of differing cultures and social ideas while tethering all of humankind. At varying scales, these pieces are striking in their confrontations with the viewers, recalling both the familiar and a broad spirituality in their execution. Each of the figurative pieces contain multiple explorations, the artist says.


“Through my work I seek to generate figurative compositions that explore the boundary between the material driven, sensorial experience of an object and the psychological resonance of our involuntary dialogues with the self-referential,” the artist says, in a statement. “I am driven by the primal act of imbuing an inanimate representation with a sense of presence, transforming it into the inspired repository of our deepest longings and aspirations. My goal is to have these compositions perform both as reflections of our shared humanity as well as question socio-cultural notions of gender, race, beauty and power.”


See more of her work below.

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