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Marcos Navarro’s Explorations of Humanity, Nature

The vibrant paintings of Marcos Navarro explore ancient and mystical ties between mankind and nature. The Spanish illustrator’s work touches the worlds of fashion, mural art, and fine art galleries. And his series “Binomio,” in particular, is the most focused realization of Navarro’s interest in humans and the natural world.

The vibrant paintings of Marcos Navarro explore ancient and mystical ties between mankind and nature. The Spanish illustrator’s work touches the worlds of fashion, mural art, and fine art galleries. And his series “Binomio,” in particular, is the most focused realization of Navarro’s interest in humans and the natural world.

“I make (reflections) about the status of humans, as well as the relationship between our own past, present and future,” he says, in a statement. “Our bond with the animals, plants or minerals, and how we influence each other. Reflect on the origins of human character, or ‘acquired’ thoughts over the time. Social standards placed before the free thoughts, the balance between the real and the imaginary. In the project ‘Binomio,’ through a serial of images, I’m showing some savage characters, primitive botanical elements, or animals that evoke a mystical connection and a retrospective insight to the evolution.”

See more of this work below.

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