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Horacio Quiroz’s Reality-Bending Explorations of the Human Mind, Body

Horacio Quiroz’s oil paintings bend and contort the body with both delicate and disconcerting results. The Mexico City-based artist began his career as an artist after spending several years in advertising. Since 2013, the artist says been attempting to “explore the oscillation between love and fear as primary antagonistic vital forces, using the human body as a tool to represent the constant movement of our reality.”


Horacio Quiroz’s oil paintings bend and contort the body with both delicate and disconcerting results. The Mexico City-based artist began his career as an artist after spending several years in advertising. Since 2013, the artist says been attempting to “explore the oscillation between love and fear as primary antagonistic vital forces, using the human body as a tool to represent the constant movement of our reality.”

“My work is a reflection on the human condition, linked intimately to my psychological and therapeutic evolution,” the artist says. “I view the body as a mechanism that not only functions physiologically, but as an emotional vessel that contains our entire temporal and spiritual history. In this way, the body perceives matter and space, through which it learns to experience its own humanity.”

Quiroz’s work has been featured in group and solo shows across the world. Even in his own self-portrait, the artist distorts and warps aspects of his image and personality for decidedly vulnerable results.

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