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Sergio Martinez’s Oil Paintings Packed with Danger, Musicality

Sergio Martinez’s oil paintings teem with movement, athleticism, and drama. The artist, born in Chile in the the mid-1960s, works in “descriptive realism.” The result of his gravitation toward cabaret and circus life translates to work full of danger and grace. A biography offers insights on Sergio’s current path.

Sergio Martinez’s oil paintings teem with movement, athleticism, and drama. The artist, born in Chile in the the mid-1960s, works in “descriptive realism.” The result of his gravitation toward cabaret and circus life translates to work full of danger and grace. A biography offers insights on Sergio’s current path.

“By the end of the 90’s, we find Sergio breaking with his artistic academism, abandoning his pre-Raphael resemblance,” the statement says. “This change allowed new forms of interpretation to appear in his work. Having discovered the great qualities of oil he began to work almost exclusively in that medium. He also changed the texture of the canvases for his works; the original soft and light cotton canvases were replaced by linen. His most important evolution, however, took place at the heart of his work, inside himself. This resulted in his moving away from the strict details of drawing, form and color, toward images created by a softness of handling, mood and composition.”

The artist’s work has been shown across the world, in the U.S., across Asia, and European spots. An early love of music also shows in this paintings, packed with dancers and performers.

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