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Steelberg’s Nostalgia-Fueled VHS Boxes for Today’s Films, TV Shows

While the power of Steelberg’s work may elude younger viewers, there are several generations of film and TV fans that are immediately engrossed by his Instagram feed. The California artist creates VHS box treatments for today’s films, television shows, and other products. The result is often pitch-perfect, complete with stickers, wear and tear, and convincing text styles.


While the power of Steelberg’s work may elude younger viewers, there are several generations of film and TV fans that are immediately engrossed by his Instagram feed. The California artist creates VHS box treatments for today’s films, television shows, and other products. The result is often pitch-perfect, complete with stickers, wear and tear, and convincing text styles.


The artist has garnered attention from national publications for his efforts, from Entertainment Weekly to Nerdist. Yet the personality behind the boxes is enigmatic, seemingly wanting to let the nostalgia-fueled creations speak for themselves.

Recent pieces warp time for “Logan,” “Get Out,” “West World,” and several other current hot properties. A favorite among the crop doesn’t even use its subject’s visuals: A box created for “10 Cloverfield Lane” uses the old Blockbuster template, even using the classic caption text to give the illusion of a fresh rental.

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