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Joshua Smith’s Made-from-Scratch Miniatures Capture Urban Landscapes

Photo Credit: Andrew Beveridge/ASB Creative Australia-based artist Joshua Smith taught himself to create absorbing, hyper-detailed miniatures of structures and objects strewn across cities. These works maintain the grounded, authentic erosion of urban environments. Many of the buildings are rundown or at the very least, aged appropriately. “His miniature works primarily focus on the often overlooked aspects of the urban environment such as grime, rust, decay to discarded cigarettes and graffiti perfectly recreated in 1:20 scale miniatures,” a statement says.


Photo Credit: Andrew Beveridge/ASB Creative

Australia-based artist Joshua Smith taught himself to create absorbing, hyper-detailed miniatures of structures and objects strewn across cities. These works maintain the grounded, authentic erosion of urban environments. Many of the buildings are rundown or at the very least, aged appropriately. “His miniature works primarily focus on the often overlooked aspects of the urban environment such as grime, rust, decay to discarded cigarettes and graffiti perfectly recreated in 1:20 scale miniatures,” a statement says.


Photo Credit: Andrew Beveridge/ASB Creative


Photo Credit: Andrew Beveridge/ASB Creative


Photo Credit: Andrew Beveridge/ASB Creative

This miniatures are made from wood, cardboard, MDF, paper, plastics, wire, spraypaint, pastels, and other materials. Works like “Black Shadow Trading Company” implement LED lighting to give the model an eerie glow.

Photo Credit: Mu Young


Photo Credit: Andrew Beveridge/ASB Creative


Photo Credit: Eli (Cigarettes Might Kill You)

Before working in miniatures, Smith had a career as both a stencil artist and a gallerist. His 17-year-career includes a stint founding and running Espionage Gallery for four years in Adelaide, South Australia. Since his career took a new direction in miniatures a couple years ago, he’s shown work in New York, Paris, Berlin, London, and major cities in his native Australia. Throughout his entire career, he’s taken part in more than 100 exhibitions.


Photo Credit: Andrew Beveridge/ASB Creative

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