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Max Guther’s Illustrations Explore Workflow, Everyday Balance

Max Guther, a 25-year-old illustrator living in Germany, Guther creates “digital collages by transforming photographic material, textures and self-constructed objects.” The artist uses a top-down perspective reminiscent of computer games of yesterday, offering both a voyeuristic and broad point of view. In a series of illustrations titled "The Goodlife," Guther explores the balance of relaxation, work, and "social environment."

Max Guther, a 25-year-old illustrator living in Germany, Guther creates “digital collages by transforming photographic material, textures and self-constructed objects.” The artist uses a top-down perspective reminiscent of computer games of yesterday, offering both a voyeuristic and broad point of view. In a series of illustrations titled “The Goodlife,” Guther explores the balance of relaxation, work, and “social environment.”

Guther’s art has been compared to games like “The Sims.” While talking to the design magazine “Form,” the artist offered some insight into how he came up with this aesthetic: “I think isometry is a very interesting perspective because you can look down on what is happening from above and thus create an all-seeing observation position,” he said. “Of course, I’ve also played computer games based on isometric perspective, but my fascination for this point of view is mainly derived from the isometric representations of Bauhaus architects and designers such as Walter Gropius and Herbert Bayer.”

Guther uses a mixture of Photoshop and Illustrator in his work. He graduated with a B.A. in communication design at Mainz University of Applied Sciences in Germany.

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