Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Amy Guidry’s Surreal Paintings Touch on Life, Death, and Nature

Amy Guidry, a North Carolina-born, Louisiana-based artist, crafts surreal acrylic works on canvas that often tie the human psyche to the natural world. Series like "In Our Veins" moves into the concepts of survival, life and death, and destruction. It’s in these works that Guidry seems to highlight the inherent beauty of flora and fauna and the strangeness buried within humanity.

Amy Guidry, a North Carolina-born, Louisiana-based artist, crafts surreal acrylic works on canvas that often tie the human psyche to the natural world. Series like “In Our Veins” moves into the concepts of survival, life and death, and destruction. It’s in these works that Guidry seems to highlight the inherent beauty of flora and fauna and the strangeness buried within humanity.

“My interest in art and psychology continues to influence my work,” Guidry says. “With surrealism being the grand marriage of the two, I was naturally drawn to every aspect behind the movement. Themes I explore involve the human psyche, who we are and how we interact with each other, and the world we live in- our relationship with other animals and nature, as well as the cycle of life and connections between all life forms. I work in series, each painting has its own message, with the overall concept conveying respect for all of nature and humanity.”

Guidry’s been featured in shows and exhibitions across the U.S. He work is part of collections at Alexandria Museum of Art, The City of Slidell, and the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art.


Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Iran-born painter Arghavan Khosravi creates surreal scenes that blend historical Persian motifs and pop cultural iconography. The artist’s own statement says that she is “deeply connected to her own personal experience of the culture and politics of her homeland of Iran that probe both personal and political experiences.” Much of her recent work has been crafted as acrylic on found textiles.
In his riveting, surreal ink drawings, Peter Striffolino builds new creatures from humanity’s building blocks. Though the Los Angeles artist's practice encompasses these drawings, paintings, and animations, we'll be taking a look at his ink work in this post. In his monochromatic work, Striffolino’s talents in texturing and linework is on display.
Steven Chmilar, a Toronto-based artist, creates oil paintings that appear as scenes that are blends of surrealism and Dutch Renaissance influences. In both his paintings and his drawn “ad series,” the artist blends humor and subtle narratives that unfold upon inspection of each corner in a given piece. An upcoming solo show at #Hashtag Gallery, titled "Wrong Century," collects his latest works. The show opens June 23. Chmilar was last featured on HiFructose.com here.
Japanese manga artist Junko Mizuno depicts the "Seven Lucky Gods," a once-disparate group of deities that became a unit through Japanese art history, in a new show at Alhambra, Calif.'s Gallery Nucleus. Although not traditionally this way, “Takarabune” transforms all of these gods of fortune into women, translated in Mizuno’s vibrant style. The show runs through Jan. 8 at the gallery. Mizuno was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List