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Bayo’s Engrossing, Introspective Pencil Drawings

Eduardo Flores, a Mexican artist that goes by the moniker “Bayo,” crafts pencil drawings that are both vivid and mythological in content. These intricate pieces are filled with both symbolism and common, everyday items, from the hides of beasts to pop culture icons. According to the artist, the pieces “intend to take the viewer through a vigorous search for that ‘something’ that endangers our existence, portrayed by absurd juxtapositions of allegories.”

Eduardo Flores, a Mexican artist that goes by the moniker “Bayo,” crafts pencil drawings that are both vivid and mythological in content. These intricate pieces are filled with both symbolism and common, everyday items, from the hides of beasts to pop culture icons. According to the artist, the pieces “intend to take the viewer through a vigorous search for that ‘something’ that endangers our existence, portrayed by absurd juxtapositions of allegories.” The artist was last featured on HiFructose.com here.

Works like “Self” hint at this knack for introspective works, with a mythical creature looming over the subject’s shoulder. Tattooed on the art of the subject is the phrase “Ne te quaesiveris extra,” a Latin phrase that translates to “Do not look outside of yourself.” This comes from Ralph Waldo Emerson’s “Self-Reliance,” and can also be looked at as conveying the advice to simply look within one’s self. Another piece, “Tezcatlipoca,” (below) shares a name with the Aztec religion’s primary deity.

Bayo’s most recent show was “Seeking an Enemy” at Redefine Gallery in Orlando, his second with the venue. The artist’s work has been featured across the world, in the U.S., German, Belgium, Spain, Mexico, and the Netherlands.

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