Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Sculptures by Anne Lemanski Explore Nature, Modernity

When studying Anne Lemanski's sculptures, the artist's choice in medium becomes just as intriguing as the subject depicted. Working from her extensive personal collection, the artist uses a variety of materials - from vinyl and book pages to textiles and vintage photos - to create life-size sculptures of animals and objects. While some pieces are more open to interpretation, others not-so-subtly address the social, political and environmental issues we face in modern times.


When studying Anne Lemanski‘s sculptures, the artist’s choice in medium becomes just as intriguing as the subject depicted. Working from her extensive personal collection, the artist uses a variety of materials – from vinyl and book pages to textiles and vintage photos – to create life-size sculptures of animals and objects. While some pieces are more open to interpretation, others not-so-subtly address the social, political and environmental issues we face in modern times.




Creating these sculptures is a labor intensive process that can take weeks or months to complete. The artist first builds a skeletal framework with copper rod, then hand stitches her chosen materials to form the “skin” of her subject. “My goal is to capture the essence of each creature and object I create,” Lemanski says in her artist statement.






Lemanski is perhaps best known for her works inspired by the animal kingdom, such as snakes “tattooed” with butterfly prints and birds fashioned from decorative papers and firecracker labels. Other works include decorated guns embellished with beading and embroidery and cut-outs of vintage paper dolls.



In many instances, the very nature of her sculptures – depicting animals with man made and artificial materials – highlights the complex relationship between nature and modern man. Her sculptures often point to man’s exploitation of animals and the impact of human activity on their habitats. For example, a water bird constructed from shiny black vinyl represents the wildlife affected by the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Another sculpture, a bull covered in etchings of needles, references the use of growth hormones in the meat and dairy industries. Some pieces are accompanied by information from news articles to further enlighten the viewer on these issues.



Lemanski is a graduate of the College for Creative Studies in Detroit and is currently based in North Carolina. Her work has been exhibited in numerous galleries in Chicago, Detroit, New York City, and Raleigh, and is part of collections in the Asheville Art Museum and North Carolina Museum of Art.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
With "Bone Pendulum in Motley" at Freight+Volume Gallery, Johnston Foster offers new, wild assemblages made from metal hardware, textiles and plastics, PVC, yoga mats, electrical wires, and other materials typically reserved for home renovation projects. Kicking off tomorrow and running through Nov. 10 at the gallery, several new pieces are included in the show.
Berlin-based French artist Jaybo Monk (covered here) creates visual collages where figures and their surroundings become one, a place that he calls "nowhere." He then mixes unexpected elements into this nonsensical space, an experimentation Jaybo also carries into his sculptural works. "I want to disobey in my paintings; disobey the symmetry, the techniques and the narratives system. I am interested in nonsense, the only space for me where freedom is real. I use tools like chance and mistakes to evaluate my craft. I flirt with the impossible. I need to go to places I`ve never been before." We visited with Jaybo in his Berlin studio, where he is now working on a new series inspired by immigration.
Lisa Roet has worked closely with scientists for the past two decades, fueling an artistic interest in primates. The physical manifestation of this passion has appeared outside and inside cultural institutions across the world. She explores the place of apes, monkeys, chimpanzees, and gorillas in the world through sculpture (both traditional and inflatable materials), photography, works on paper, and other multimedia projects.
Meredith James is like a latter day Alice in Wonderland documenting what she sees in her journey down and through a contemporary rabbit hole. Her videos, installations, and sculptures play with scale and trompe l’oeil to create optical illusions that are as disruptive as they are funny. In "Day Shift", a short video, she plays a security guard who, having just left work, crawls into the backseat of her SUV and reemerges as a miniature figure in the building's security monitor. In Ames Landscape, an installation, two figures stand in a glade. A large mountain reaches skyward in the distance. The space is configured so that, though the space is logically consistent, one figure stands much taller than the other. In Hallway, another installation, a door opens onto stairs that lead down to the basement. The stairs, of course, go nowhere because the space is flat. The fact that the illusion is a dead ringer for the space's actual stairs that lead to a real basement is not even remotely coincidental.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List