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Inhabiting Otherworldly Environments Created by The Very Many

To step inside a creation by The Very Many is to briefly cross over into an alien world. The New York City-based studio, led by French artist-architect Marc Fornes, makes installations and environments that can feel both functional and purely aesthetic. The studio says its specialization is “computational design and digital fabrication,” though the results can feel organic in nature. Fornes was last featured on HiFructose.com here.


To step inside a creation by The Very Many is to briefly cross over into an alien world. The New York City-based studio, led by French artist-architect Marc Fornes, makes installations and environments that can feel both functional and purely aesthetic. The studio says its specialization is “computational design and digital fabrication,” though the results can feel organic in nature. Fornes was last featured on HiFructose.com here.




The group’s clientele is diverse, from colleges and pop-stores to convention centers and permanent outdoors structures created for the public. The Very Many’s site says Marc’s work for a pop up store for Louis Vuitton and Yayoi Kusama, shown above, “is the very first carbon fiber self-supported shell structure applied to architecture.” That project nabbed a A+ Jury Award, as well as an award from the International Interior Design Association.


The “SPINEWAY” project, shown above, is a permanent structure created in San Antonio. The enormous piece provides an entry point to the city’s Woodlawn Lake Park. “A conceptual bridge with surrounding neighborhoods, the piece reflects the movement of people from every direction that use the park,” The Very Many says.



For the group’s 2013 exhibit at the Museum of Art and Design in New York City, they explain the importance of digital fabrication: “[The exhibit] will explore the many areas of 21st-century creativity made possible by advanced methods of computer-assisted production known as digital fabrication. In today’s postdigital world, artists are using these means to achieve levels of expression never before possible – an explosive, unprecedented scope of artistic expression that extends from sculptural fantasy to functional beauty.”


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