Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Mike Perry’s “Intoxicating Pollen Wiggling in a Moist Journey of Constantly Blooming Tides”

New York based painter and illustrator Mike Perry is an artist working in a variety of mediums, once describing his collection of works as having an "antsy" energy. He doodles around the clock, whether creating new typefaces for his graphic design work or new burst of colorful characters that amass in his paintings. At his website, he writes that his creative goal is "to conjure that feeling of soul-soaring wonder you have when you stare into distant galaxies on a dark night, when you go on long journeys into the imagination, when you ponder what it is that this life is all about."

New York based painter and illustrator Mike Perry is an artist working in a variety of mediums, once describing his collection of works as having an “antsy” energy. He doodles around the clock, whether creating new typefaces for his graphic design work or new burst of colorful characters that amass in his paintings. At his website, he writes that his creative goal is “to conjure that feeling of soul-soaring wonder you have when you stare into distant galaxies on a dark night, when you go on long journeys into the imagination, when you ponder what it is that this life is all about.”


Artist Mike Perry in his New York studio.

If the title of Perry’s most recent solo “Intoxicating Pollen Wiggling in a Moist Journey of Constantly Blooming Tides” is any indication, humor and abstraction are integral to his work: at its core, his images celebrate the human form which he transforms into lyrical shapes and lines. His newer large-scale paintings embody all of his work’s signature elements: vibrant colors and wacky compositions that evoke our childhood drawings while also closely examining the sexuality and expressiveness of the figure. Often, his work is compared to artists like Henri Matisse, for his use of color and his fluid and original draftsmanship.

Perry writes, “How did we all end up here now, at this time, in this place? How do we respond to and resolve the mystery that surrounds us? What do we do when our soul calls us somewhere we do not know the name of or the directions to, but only the feeling of? When we are lost in longing, how can we remember what makes us laugh and allow ourselves to giggle and be tickled? There are many thoughts and stories and celebrations that remain to be told, so many sketches that you have not yet seen.” Mike Perry’s “Intoxicating Pollen Wiggling in a Moist Journey of Constantly Blooming Tides” is on view at Garis & Hahn in New York through tomorrow, April 22nd, 2016.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Connecticut based artist Carly Janine Mazur employs a limited palette and repetitive design in her portraits. Her latest series, "Metamorphosis", on view at Arch Enemy Arts gallery in Philadelphia, shows her growing interest in this mixture of the figurative and abstract. Working in oils and acrylics with metallic accents, her paintings portray classical-bodied female nudes intermingling with their environment.
Recently named the most popular artist of 2014, Yayoi Kusama (HF Vol. 25) has currently taken over two expansive spaces at David Zwirner Gallery in New York. Her exhibition, "Give Me Love," which closes this week, includes a reenactment of her popular installation, "The Obliteration Room" (2002), new pumpkin sculptures, and paintings. They share the hallucinatory, obsessive, and energetic qualities we've seen throughout her career, something this exhibition aims to embody. More photos after the jump.
Earlier this month, we shared with you the intriguing embroidered installations by Beijing based artist Gao Rong, uncanny and realistic replicas of her childhood home in inner Mongolia. Using the Chinese embroidery she learned growing up as her primary technique, Rong was able to create stunning copies of artifacts from her memories for that series. Her new series applies the same handicraft but to a much more minimal, even painstaking degree. Aptly titled "The Simple Line", Rong goes in the opposite direction of her complicated and detailed spaces and embraces simplicity and abstraction.
In drawing the world around him, New York based artist Mike Lee conveys a simple and playful essence of his subjects, whether they be people, buildings, or objects. Featured here on our blog, the artist's intriguing drawings of miniaturized scenes have often been compared to a child's Playmobil or Lego playsets. In these new versions of his subjects, Lee further simplifies the human form, isolating them from their toy-like environments and focusing instead on finding expression through minimalism.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List