Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Brian Viveros Debuts New Paintings of His Smokey-Eyed Vixens in New York

When California based painter Brian M. Viveros debuted his "Matador" series last year, he unleashed a side of his sultry, smokey-eyed vixens that hadn't been seen before. His subjects still exuded the sexiness that the "Dirtyland" artist has become known for, but clad in painstakingly detailed and shining clothing inspired by the iconic bullfighter, they held a newfound sense of passion and fire. For his upcoming solo at SCOPE New York, his first east coast showing since 2012, Viveros sought to channel the toughness and splendor from his "Matador" series in a new body of work.


Photo by Birdman

When California based painter Brian M. Viveros debuted his “Matador” series last year, he unleashed a side of his sultry, smokey-eyed vixens that hadn’t been seen before. His subjects still exuded the sexiness that the “Dirtyland” artist has become known for, but clad in painstakingly detailed and shining clothing inspired by the iconic bullfighter, they held a newfound sense of passion and fire.

Viveros found himself drawn to the details of their fashion in particular, pulling inspiration from the fighter’s traje de luces (or the “suit of lights”), a visual metaphor for the fires within the matador’s own heart. Fashion has played a symbolic role in Viveros’ imagery since his first “Dirtyland” paintings. His matador is an icon that expands from his “mad, mad world of smoking troops”, images of cigar-smoking women in devil-horned and Mickey Mouse-eared helmets, ready for battle. The helmet represents strength to Viveros who flips the roles previously given to men in traditional portraiture, and replaces them with tough women.


Photo by Birdman

For his upcoming solo at SCOPE New York, his first east coast showing since 2012, Viveros sought to channel the toughness and splendor from his “Matador” series in a new body of work. His new paintings and charcoal drawings employ higher levels of saturated colors, use of patterns, and detailing that give his subjects an added intensity. In contrast to the severity of her bloody and scratched gear and weaponry, Viveros decorates each woman with a delicate Dia De Los Muertos-inspired rose and skulls, motifs that have become a signature of his portraits- just don’t be fooled by their seductive glares. “They are not victims in any way,” Viveros says, “they are heroines”, and the blood that splatters them is from a battle that has been won.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
For Toronto based artist Brian Donnelly, featured here, painting is a risky business. At first beautifully rendered in oil, he then sprays his subjects with turpentine and hand sanitizer until their faces are distorted beyond recognition, to a more limited expression. Donnelly's work is all about embracing limitations: "I ask a lot of questions about art and how we define it," he says. "How far away from the original state can we go before we stop calling something art? In the process, I end up drawing a parallel between the fragile nature of artwork and the human condition."
What does it mean to be "normal"? Normality is different to different people, generally applying to what is considered acceptable and not out of the ordinary. To Los Angeles based artist Wyatt Mills, the idea of being "normal" has a broad meaning that he addresses in his latest series of chaotic mixed media paintings. Mills is an artist that likes to make observations about the human psyche, relating his work to a reflection of his reality which is never one thing and switches between different styles.
New Zealand based artist Meredith Marsone's muted oil portraits reveal glimpses of her subjects in emotional and peaceful moments, "sparks" of realism amidst abstraction. They are typically painted with realistic details juxtaposed against areas of impasto, paint applied thickly enough that the brush or painting-knife strokes are visible. It's a technique that she admits was borne out of frustration and is an artistically risky one, a process that she details at her Youtube channel and blog, where she recently wrote, "I think the best work I've made has been about things that are meaningful to me personally and have been about something I've had experience in."
Nicolas Uribe’s painted portraits contain varying levels of abstraction, injecting both a surreal and engrossing quality into each work. The Colombia-based painter has also delved into kinetic scenes in this style, all carrying the intimacy and unsteadiness of memory.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List