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Chet Zar’s 3D Group Exhibition “Conjoined” Celebrates 6 Years

Surrealist and sculptor Chet Zar's brain child, the "Conjoined" group exhibition, notorious for its mixture of whimsical and disturbing art works, has compelled crowds to Santa Monica's Copro Gallery for years. Featured here on our blog, the show is a presentation of 2D and 3D pieces by internationally known and up and coming artists alike who delve into subjects that are the stuff of our dreams and nightmares. The idea first came about in 2010, when Zar, who comes from a background in move special effects where 3D maquettes are a big part of the process, was eager to see a show devoted to more sculptural forms. "Conjoined" celebrated it's 6th anniversary last Saturday with the opening of "Conjoined 666", named after the "number of the beast" in most manuscripts of chapter 13 of the Book of Revelation, of the New Testament, and also in popular culture.


Chet Zar

Surrealist and sculptor Chet Zar’s brain child, the “Conjoined” group exhibition, notorious for its mixture of whimsical and disturbing art works, has compelled crowds to Santa Monica’s Copro Gallery for years. Featured here on our blog, the show is a presentation of 2D and 3D pieces by internationally known and up and coming artists alike who delve into subjects that are the stuff of our dreams and nightmares. The idea first came about in 2010, when Zar, who comes from a background in move special effects where 3D maquettes are a big part of the process, was eager to see a show devoted to more sculptural forms. “Conjoined” celebrated it’s 6th anniversary last Saturday with the opening of “Conjoined 666”, named after the “number of the beast” in most manuscripts of chapter 13 of the Book of Revelation, of the New Testament, and also in popular culture. This set the tone for a plethora of religious and mythological themed works from artists such as Sarina Brewer’s golden taxidermy mer-goat, Menton3’s beautiful yet haunting portrait of a deity, and several “Angel of Death” inspired creatures by artists like Tokyo Jesus and Akihito Ikeda. The exhibit was also not without its usual dose of “creepiness”, as in pieces like Tayler Brown’s silicone double-headed Chimera, John Haley III’s alienesque steel works, William Hand’s monstrous mutated figure trapped in a jar, and Chet Zar’s own titular piece, featuring two conjoined human heads in the shape of a skin-toned heart. Another major highlight were monumental-scale animatronics by master modeler Lee Shamel, rotating mechanical hands that held up glowing scepters. Take a look at these and more works in our opening night coverage of “Conjoined 666” below, on view at Copro Gallery in Santa Monica through February 6th, 2016.

Opening night photos by Mik Luxon.


William Hand


Tokyo Jesus


Beast Brothers


Alex Pardee


Menton3


Brian Smith


Nathan Cartwright


Kazuhiro Tsuji


Dave Correia


Dave Correia


Michael Rosner


Peter Goode


Tom Taggart


Brian Poor

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