Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Seung Mo Park’s New Steel Mesh Works Portray Dreams Vs. Reality

Currently living and working in Brooklyn, sculptor Seung Mo Park creates ethereal portraits cut from layers of stainless steel and wire mesh. We first featured the Korean artist on our blog in 2012, where we gave you a first look at his unbelievable works that explore concepts of tangibility and the illusion of existence. Take a look at Park's most recent works to date after the jump!

Currently living and working in Brooklyn, sculptor Seung Mo Park creates ethereal portraits cut from layers of stainless steel and wire mesh. We first featured the Korean artist on our blog in 2012, where we gave you a first look at his unbelievable works that explore concepts of tangibility and the illusion of existence. With some pieces measuring larger than life at over 10 feet tall, Park’s process begins by overlapping layers of steel mesh, rotating them so they are slightly out of line with one another. He then sketches his own photographs onto the steel meshes and cuts them out, creating careful shading that contours his subjects in a way that feels both weighty and translucent. In his ongoing series, titled “Maya” (meaning “illusion” in Sanskrit”), Park continues to portray anonymous women as they have appeared in his dreams, as well as new imagery based on his reality, depicting every day scenes from his life in New York, such as the city lights, pedestrians crossing the street, and melancholy patrons at a bar. Take a look at Park’s most recent works to date below, courtesy of the artist.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Patti Warashina is a Pacific Northwest based artist known for her imaginative ceramic sculptures that are full of wit and sarcasm. At age 76, she does not stop inventing. Featured here on our blog, her clay figures are usually placed in fantasy environments, where she uses sculpture to explore such themes as the human condition, feminism, car-culture, and political and social topics.
Alessandro Gallo's ceramic human-animal characters are often caught in the most candid and casual moments. Gallo’s garnered a reputation for these hybrid creatures, such as the one above, currently featured in the “Ceramics Now” show at The International Museum of Ceramics in Faenza.
Roni Landa, an Israeli artist based in Tel Aviv, creates polymer clay sculptures that combine the natural shapes of fruits and flora and the texture of butchered meat. “Very Still Life” comments on life and death–a delicate, yet sometimes unsettling display that challenges the world’s current order. Landa takes inspiration from classical sculpture, product and commercial design, and even the culinary world, evidenced by her current body of work.
Recycling packaging materials and other discardables, photographer Suzanne Jongmans crafts Renaissance-style portraits that examine contemporary consumption. The artist finds value in these otherwise overlooked materials; elsewhere, she piles clothes and finds beauty in unfinished garments.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List