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Patrick Hughes’ Surreal 3D Paintings Play with Perspective

English artist Patrick Hughes' paintings make an object out of the world as we see it- a type of work that he calls "reverspective" painting or combining painting with making objects. In his reverspectives, interiors of art museums, houses, and multiple buildings under crystal blue skies, are broken apart and as one moves around the picture, they fold together into a solidified space. It is a trick of our own perceptions, as the pieces are actually an immobile, abstract sculpture. In essence, once could also call Hughes' work sculptural paintings.

English artist Patrick Hughes’ paintings make an object out of the world as we see it- a type of work that he calls “reverspective” painting or combining painting with making objects. In his reverspectives, interiors of art museums, houses, and multiple buildings under crystal blue skies, are broken apart and as one moves around the picture, they fold together into a solidified space.

It is a trick of our own perceptions, as the pieces are actually an immobile, abstract sculpture. In essence, once could also call Hughes’ work sculptural paintings. Hughes painted his first reverspective in 1964, later returning to the idea in the late 1980s. They are painted in oil on board constructed with two, three, or four projecting ends where forced and reverse perspective are used to create the illusion of movement.

“When the principles of perspective are reversed and solidified into sculpted paintings something extraordinary happens; the mind is deceived into believing the impossible, that a static painting can move of its own accord,” Hughes says. “I hope it’s an experience unlike any other, in which viewers see the impossible happen. And I hope that they then think a bit about why that is. If lookers and see-ers experience the paradox and reciprocity of the world and themselves, they get a sense of the flow of life.”

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