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Miami Art Week 2015: Street Art Highlights from Wynwood

There was no escaping the madness that was Miami Art Week. While collectors and art fans alike were inside taking in all of the fairs and staying dry, more street artists than ever before descended upon the Wynwood area to leave their mark. Heavy rains and wind posed a challenge for most, but that could not keep artists like D*Face, Twoone, Nychos, Tristan Eaton, Boxhead, 1010, Caratoes, and countless others from killing several large-scale walls and collaborations. Take a look at our highlights from Wynwood after the jump!


The all-female “Wanter & Wayfare” wall in Wynwood, Miami. Photo by Rob Evans.

There was no escaping the madness that was Miami Art Week. While collectors and art fans alike were inside taking in all of the fairs and staying dry, more street artists than ever before descended upon the Wynwood area to leave their mark. Heavy rains and wind posed a challenge for most, but that could not keep artists like D*Face, Twoone, Nychos, Tristan Eaton, Boxhead, 1010, Caratoes, and countless others from killing several large-scale walls and collaborations. Among our favorite projects this year included the “Sea Walls: Murals for Oceans- Art Basel Miami” series, an entire block curated by Urban Nation and PangeaSeed Foundation, where murals by artists like James Bullough, Jason Botkin, NEVERCREW, Li-Hill, and Aaron Glasson addressed issues of climate on the world’s oceans. Another highlight was the all-female “Wander & Wayfare” wall, a collaboration between 7 female artists, which started as an idea by Hueman and was co-organized by Rocha Arts. Not far away, the Wynwood Walls complex was given a makeover as the Wynwood Walls Garden, which debuted with a special celebration featuring murals by 14 international artists including INTI, Alexis Diaz, Logan Hicks, The London Police, Miss Van, and a flowery installation by FAFI. Check out more of our street art highlights from Wynwood below.


Ian Ross and Tatiana Suarez. Photo by David Wilman.


Tatiana Suarez. Photo by David Wilman.


Alexis Diaz. Photo by David Wilman.


Alexis Diaz. Photo by David Wilman.


Ian Ross and Max Eherman aka “Eon75”. Photo by David Wilman.


Johnny Robles. Photo by David Wilman.


Boxhead. Photo by David Wilman.


Nychos. Photo by David Wilman.


Nychos. Photo by David Wilman.


Eduardo “Kobra”. Photo by David Wilman.


Kevin Ledo and Fin DAC. Photo by David Wilman.


Kevin Ledo and Fin DAC


Ben Eine


HOXXOH. Photo by David Wilman.


Max Ehrman. Photo by David Wilman.


Max Ehrman. Photo by David Wilman.


Richard Henderson AKA Hauser. Photo by David Wilman.


NOVE. Photo by David Wilman.


NOVE. Photo by David Wilman.


NOVE. Photo by Spoke Bike.


Mina & Zosen. Photo by Spoke Bike.


Twoone. Photo by Spoke Bike.


Jose Di Gregorio. Photo by David Wilman.


Aaron Glasson. Photo by David Wilman.


Jonny Alexander and Aaron Glasson. Photo by Enriqueta Arias.


NEVERCREW


James Bullough and Li-Hill. Photo courtesy the artists.


Bikismo. Photo by David Wilman.


Bikismo. Photo by Enriqueta Arias.


Esao Andrews. Photo by Enriqueta Arias.


INTI. Photo by Enriqueta Arias.


D*Face. Photo by Enriqueta Arias.


Caratoes


1010 and Caratoes. Photo by 1xRun.


Martin Whatson


Jason Botkin aka “KIN”. Photo courtesy the artist.


Typo


FAFI

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