Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Sculptor Sophie Ryder Opens Her Spellbinding Studio to the Public

One look at artist Sophie Ryder's hybrid animal sculptures and you'll be whisked away into some mystical world. "I sculpt characters and beings- the dogs, the hares, the minotaurs... are all characters beyond animal form. I am not interested in making a replica," she has said. The charming and remote cottage where she makes her work, featured here, is not far off from the fantasy that it creates. Ryder's studio is located in the countryside of Colin Valley in the Gloucestershire Cotswolds, England, a beautiful but isolated place that rarely sees visitors. On November 20th, she will open her cottage up to the public for a rare showing of her works, including sculpture, plaster works, drawings, among other pieces.

One look at artist Sophie Ryder’s hybrid animal sculptures and you’ll be whisked away into some mystical world. “I sculpt characters and beings- the dogs, the hares, the minotaurs… are all characters beyond animal form. I am not interested in making a replica,” she has said. The charming and remote cottage where she makes her work, featured here, is not far off from the fantasy that it creates. Ryder’s studio is located in the countryside of Colin Valley in the Gloucestershire Cotswolds, England, a beautiful but isolated place that rarely sees visitors. On November 20th, she will open her cottage up to the public for a rare showing of her works, including sculpture, plaster works, drawings, among other pieces. It is more like a moving sale, before she relocates to her new studio. Among Ryder’s many treasures, visitors will be greeted by her famous towering “Lady-Hare”, a counter part to Greek mythology’s Minotaur, wire sculptures hanging from arched windows, and various other creatures inhabiting the fields around the cottage. They are made from practically everything; sawdust, wet plaster, old machine parts and toys, weld joins and angle grinders, wire “pancakes”, torn scraps of paper, charcoal sticks and acid baths. But it is Ryder’s ability to see beyond their construction that makes them real, and her imagination is infectious to anyone who walks through her door.

All photos by Andreas Von Einsiedel, unless otherwise noted.


Photo courtesy of the artist.


Photo courtesy of the artist.


Photo courtesy of the artist.

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Using video work and other technology, Maarten Baas creates clocks that appear to be inhabited by men who appear to be manually keeping time, each actually a 12-hour recorded performance being displayed. He’s created these in varying scales, from human-sized grandfather clocks to the major project Schiphol clock, located international terminal of an Amsterdam airport.
Brooklyn, NY based artist Dennis Mcnett's spirit animal is the wolfbat, a moniker that he has adopted for his dynamic wood carvings and installations featuring creatures, full scale temples and vehicles like viking ships inspired by Norse mythology. His wolfbat character has origins in Fenrir, a monstrous wolf that has been depicted in art and literature throughout history, sometimes as a metaphor for Satan or Goliath, other times as a symbol for rebellion against authority.
Some refer to them as glass and stone enchantments, others as tomb-like and unsettling, but to artist Christina Bothwell, her work is highly spiritual. Her translucent figures rising from their bodies evoke images of a butterfly emerging from its chrysalis, feeling mutually protected and secure but also fragile in spite of their hardy material. We first featured Bothwell's works on our blog, and since then, she has gone on to explore more personal themes, dealing with the fear of her own mortality, as well as the fragility and temporary qualities of our bodies, versus the idea that we are more than just physical beings.
Baltimore, Maryland based artist Brad Blair designs imaginative sculptural monstrosities that combine features of real world animals with those from our dreams and nightmares. His works are an elaborate mixture of media, made of primarily clay and ceramic, natural parts like fox tails and fish fins, rubber cast tongues, and mechanical elements like watches and monofilament, giving them a certain science-fiction or cyborg quality.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List