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Juan Travieso Debuts His Futuristic Paintings of Nature in NY

Miami based artist Juan Travieso brings nature to life in his colorful and geometric paintings. Growing up in Havana, Cuba, he loved being outside and exploring his natural surroundings. This passion developed into his appreciation for nature, the core component of his design oriented style. In our interview with the artist, he shared, "As a part of nature, I am aware of the fact that we are trying so hard as a species to disconnect ourselves from what we are. I feel that it is my responsibility as an artist and as a citizen of the world to give voice to the powerless species on this earth."

Miami based artist Juan Travieso brings nature to life in his colorful and geometric paintings. Growing up in Havana, Cuba, he loved being outside and exploring his natural surroundings. This passion developed into his appreciation for nature, the core component of his design oriented style. In our interview with the artist, he shared, “As a part of nature, I am aware of the fact that we are trying so hard as a species to disconnect ourselves from what we are. I feel that it is my responsibility as an artist and as a citizen of the world to give voice to the powerless species on this earth.” Travieso recently made his debut in New York with a new series that offers a futuristic look at nature, particularly endangered species. His show “Little Robot [Future Loading]” at Jenn Singer Gallery addresses issues like the inevitable extinction of some animals as a result of our ignorance. To Travieso, technology plays a large role in our distraction from what is truly important. It is represented in cubic, abstract forms that intervene images of creatures like gorillas and numerous birds. Looking over them is a portrait of an innocent looking young boy, the Little Robot, who shares in their doomed future.

Juan Travieso’s “Little Robot [Future Loading]” is now on view at Jenn Singer Gallery in New York through November 11th, 2015.

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