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Michel Lamoller Cuts Up Photographs into Trippy Portraits

At some point in his career, Berlin based photographer Michel Lamoller says he grew tired with making simple prints. This eventually led to him to cutting up his pictures of people and landscapes into trippy multi-dimensional portraits. Lamoller grew up near the Black Forest of Germany and the hilly region left a lasting impression on him. Inspired by the shapes and feel of his homeland, his work toys with our perception of our surroundings.

At some point in his career, Berlin based photographer Michel Lamoller says he grew tired with making simple prints. This eventually led to him to cutting up his pictures of people and landscapes into trippy multi-dimensional portraits. Lamoller grew up near the Black Forest of Germany and the hilly region left a lasting impression on him. Inspired by the shapes and feel of his homeland, his work toys with our perception of our surroundings. His series titled “Tautochronos” comprises of different photographs taken of the same places like buildings, trees, walls and fences, which are then placed onto photographs of every day people. By layering images captured at multiple angles and times, Lamoller is able to deconstruct the nuanced movement between moments. In one image, the contour of a woman merges seamlessly with mossy tree bark, and in another, a man appears to dissolve into the brick wall he clings to. It is difficult to see where one image ends and the other begins. Superimposed with their environment in an experiment with time and space, ordinary subjects suddenly become extraordinary.

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