Menu
The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Craig LaRotonda Presents New Works in “A Consortium of Lost Souls”

New York based artist Craig LaRotonda creates multimedia works in a unique style reminiscent of Renaissance and Byzantine art. His detailed and layered paintings have a darkness that is matched by his sculptural pieces that look like religious relics. Opening September 4th, he will exhibit a new series of paintings and sculptures in "A Consortium of Lost Souls" at Stranger Factory in New Mexico.

New York based artist Craig LaRotonda creates multimedia works in a unique style reminiscent of Renaissance and Byzantine art. His detailed and layered paintings have a darkness that is matched by his sculptural pieces that look like religious relics. Opening September 4th, he will exhibit a new series of paintings and sculptures in “A Consortium of Lost Souls” at Stranger Factory in New Mexico. “It is the first time I will be showing this many sculptures since about 2003. The story is the same told through each medium. 2D work is mixed media paintings on wood panels. The 3D pieces are a unique collection of hand sculpted elements and found objects and remnants all stained with a veneer of time,” he says. LaRotonoda often pulls inspiration for his dark themes from his own psyche. As his show title suggests, his latest figurative pieces portray an eclectic gathering of “lost souls” from his usual monkeys, to cyborg shaman and other iconclastic creatures. Lost in an empty “timeless” space, they emote the gloom that comes with the cruelty of their reality. Take a look at our preview of “A Consortium of Lost Souls” by Craig LaRotonda below, courtesy of the artist.

(Work in progress)

Meta
Share
Facebook
Reddit
Pinterest
Email
Related Articles
Illustrator/comic artist Jim Mahfood’s dynamic works carry both an absorbing and kinetic energy. He calls his work "visual funk: a hybrid mix of comix art, graffiti, manga, street art, and funk culture." His work is currently featured in the show “Stacking Pyramids” at Stranger Factory in Albuquerque, N.M. The show kicks off Nov. 3 and runs through Nov. 26.
Stan Manoukian Grograou, a native of Paris, France, has always had quite the love for comics, science fiction, and monster movies. From this central passion, Stan has found a way to feed a lifetime fascination for drawing, painting and even sculpting his creatures. At age 15, Stan’s drive took him to the Ecole Estienne in Paris, where he enrolled to pursue becoming a comic book artist. It was here, in his teens that he became inspired by an illustrated edition of Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein. Stan was immediately turned on by the fact that as an artist it was possible to write comics as well as pay tribute to the classical artists. Stan takes time out give us an exclusive interview about his work, personal life and what inspires him as an artist - after the jump.
Rebecca Leveille’s vibrant new body of work may come has a surprise to fans of the soft, dream-like quality of her previous pieces, featured here on our blog. "You can probably see my love of Lautrec, Japanese prints and Gerda Wegner in the new body", she explains. For her upcoming solo show "Savage Garden", opening at Corey Helford Gallery in Los Angeles on March 26th, her subjects' previous sensuality is brought to an elegant and refined shape.
"Their world was soft like melancholy. The conversation was silent. Their faces were small and round, incapable of invoking fear. Once the door was open, nothing could be unseen." This is how Kathie Olivas describes the childlike subjects of her latest exhibition at AFA gallery, "Safe from Tomorrow". The show boasts a series of 20 new paintings and 16 sculptures inspired by early Americana portraiture. The nostalgia felt by her palette and inspiration is constrasted with a concept set in the future.

Subscribe to the Hi-Fructose Mailing List