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The New Contemporary Art Magazine

Hi-Fructose Volume 36 Preview!

Our 36th volume of Hi-Fructose New Contemporary Art Magazine arrives in July! Featured in our next print issue is: a major feature on art pioneer Robert Williams, the colorful installations of Pip & Pop, a review of cover artist Kehinde Wiley's new monograph, Erin M. Riley's embroidered selfies, Chiho Aoshima's solo exhibition in Seattle, Cinta Vidal Agullo's mesmerizing paintings, new works from Portland artist Blaine Fontana, the paintings of Mike Davis, a thought provoking article on the art and travels of street artist Swoon, plus reviews on the Sick Rose; featuring medical illustrations from tester-year and much more! Also, We're thrilled to present this issue's special 16-page insert section featuring Winnie Truong's beautifully strange color pencil drawings, all in one issue!

Cover artist: Kehinde Wiley

Our 36th volume of Hi-Fructose New Contemporary Art Magazine arrives in July! Featured in our next print issue is: a major feature on art pioneer Robert Williams, the colorful installations of Pip & Pop, a review of cover artist Kehinde Wiley’s new monograph, Erin M. Riley’s embroidered selfies, Chiho Aoshima’s solo exhibition in Seattle, Cinta Vidal Agullo’s mesmerizing paintings, new works from Portland artist Blaine Fontana, the paintings of Mike Davis, a thought provoking article on the art and travels of street artist Swoon, plus reviews on the Sick Rose; featuring medical illustrations from tester-year and much more! Also, We’re thrilled to present this issue’s special 16-page insert section featuring Winnie Truong’s beautifully strange color pencil drawings, all in one issue!

Pre-Order our next issue here, and see more sneak peeks below.

Swoon

Blaine Fontana

Chiho Aoshima

Cinta

Mike Daris

Erin M. Riley

Pip & Pop

Winnie Truong

Robert Williams

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If Pip and Pop's colorful work looks good enough to eat, that's because it is — sort of. The artist creates bright, crystalline installations using sugary candy, glitter, and cheap toys and knickknacks. These elements accumulate into mystical, glimmering environments filled with pastel-colored sand dunes, rainbow-hued rocks, and enchanted-looking flora. Based in Australia, Pip and Pop began as a duo comprised of Tanya Schultz and Nicole Andrijevic. In 2011, Andrijevic left to pursue other projects and Schultz has been the brains behind the operation since, often inviting guest artists to collaborate with her. Since we last featured Pip and Pop in 2012 (here), she has created confectionary paradises at various venues in the Netherlands, Japan, Taiwan, and Australia. Take a look at her recent work below.
Kehinde Wiley’s larger-than-life paintings (featured in HF Vol. 29) insert black and brown individuals into the typically all-white history of Western portraiture. His subjects, a majority of whom are urban males, are cast in poses that assertively beckon old master paintings of European kings and emperors. Some gallantly ride horses, while others don regalia. All figures peer commandingly at the viewer in Wiley’s 14-year survey “Kehinde Wiley: A New Republic” currently on view at the Brooklyn Museum.
On January 21, Kehinde Wiley was honored with the United States Department of State Medal of the Arts for his contributions to the White House's cultural diplomacy outreach. Wiley's opulent paintings (featured in Hi-Fructose Vol. 29) are known for sparking conversations surrounding race, colonialism, and the art historical canon. He has traveled the world to paint people of various African diasporic communities (see our coverage of his last solo show, "The World Stage: Haiti," here).
In 2011, Feminist artist group the Guerilla Girls discovered that fewer than 4% of artists in the Metropolitan Museum’s modern art section are women. While things are getting better, statistics still show that opportunities are low for women in the art world, with women earning 29% less than their male counterparts. In the spirit of the Guerilla Girls, FFDG Gallery in San Francisco has rounded up a group of 25 international female artists to represent the 4%. They call themselves the "4%ers": Mariel Bayona, Pakayla Rae Biehn, Monica Canilao, Claw Money, Deb, Lola Dupre, Kristin Farr, Michelle Fleck, Angela Fox, Mel Kadel, Aubrey Learner, Lauren Napolitano, Kelly Ording, Pacolli, Meryl Pataky, Emily Proud, Bunnie Reiss, Erin M. Riley, Jenny Sharaf, Minka Sicklinger, Winnie Truong, Kelly Tunstall, Nicomi Nix Turner, and Lauren YS working in various media.

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